Catholic church – Parish Church http://parishchurch.org.uk/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 07:39:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://parishchurch.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-37-120x120.png Catholic church – Parish Church http://parishchurch.org.uk/ 32 32 Meet the 10 new Blesseds of the Catholic Church https://parishchurch.org.uk/meet-the-10-new-blesseds-of-the-catholic-church/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/meet-the-10-new-blesseds-of-the-catholic-church/ When one of the soldiers tried to force the sister out of the room, she successfully resisted, clinging to the cross and calling on Mary for help: “Holy Mother of God, allow me to die virgin, protect my purity! On March 1, 1945, while the sisters were praying and Sister Maria Sabina repeated her request […]]]>

When one of the soldiers tried to force the sister out of the room, she successfully resisted, clinging to the cross and calling on Mary for help: “Holy Mother of God, allow me to die virgin, protect my purity!

On March 1, 1945, while the sisters were praying and Sister Maria Sabina repeated her request to Mary, a bullet pierced the door and struck her in the chest, killing her. She was buried in the Catholic cemetery in Lubań.

Blessed Sister Maria Melusja (Marta) Rybka. Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.

Blessed Sister Maria Melusja (Marta) Rybka was born on July 11, 1905 in Pawłow, near Racibórz. She entered the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth in 1927 and made her perpetual vows on July 31, 1934. She spent her life as a nun at the Maison Saint-Georges in Nysa, working in the garden and the bakery, and doing household. . During World War II, she cared for the elderly and sick and cared for girls in housekeeping school.

On March 24, 1945, Sister Maria Melusja was attacked and shot by a Red Army soldier while defending a girl who was being assaulted. According to witnesses, the sister saved the house from the fire, because the fire started by the soldiers stopped in front of the room where the body of the sister lay in a pool of blood.

The sister’s body is buried in a mass grave in the Sisters’ Garden at 16 Słowiańska Street in Nysa.

Blessed Sister Maria Sapientia (Łucja) Heymann.  Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.
Blessed Sister Maria Sapientia (Łucja) Heymann. Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.

Blessed Sister Maria Sapientia (Łucja) Heymann was born on April 19, 1875 in Lubiesz, near Wałcz, in northwestern Poland. She entered the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth in 1894 and made her perpetual profession on July 2, 1906. She worked as a nurse in Hamburg and then in Nysa.

When the Red Army entered Nysa, the atmosphere of fear and uncertainty increased. On March 24, 1945, soldiers ordered the sisters of St. Elizabeth’s house to assemble in the refectory. One of the soldiers approached a young sister and wanted to take her away. Blessed Maria Sapientia implored him to give up saying, “No, I beg you, no”. The soldier put his gun to his head and fired.

Her mortal remains were buried in a common grave in the monastery garden of St. Elizabeth’s House in Nysa.

Blessed Sister Maria Acutina (Helena) Goldberg.  Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.
Blessed Sister Maria Acutina (Helena) Goldberg. Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.

Blessed Sister Maria Acutina (Helena) Goldberg was born on July 6, 1882 in Dłużek, then in East Prussia. At 23, she joined the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth and made her perpetual vows on July 25, 1917.

For many years she worked as a nurse in a spa sanatorium in Wleń and in a home for retired priests in Nysa. From 1941 she worked in an orphanage in Lubiąż as a guardian of war orphans.

Aware of the brutality of the Red Army soldiers who entered the city on January 26, 1945, Sister Maria Acutina continually watches over the safety of the girls entrusted to her care. On May 2, 1945, she was shot while defending them.

The body of Sister Maria Acutina was buried in the parish cemetery of Krzydlina Mała, in southwestern Poland.

Blessed Sister Maria Adela (Klara) Schramm.  Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.
Blessed Sister Maria Adela (Klara) Schramm. Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.

Blessed Sister Maria Adela (Klara) Schramm was born on June 3, 1885 in Łączna near Kłodzko in southwestern Poland.

In 1912, she joined the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth and made her perpetual vows on June 29, 1924. She worked in Ramułtowice, Szklarska Poręba, Wałbrzych-Sobięcin and Godzieszów, where she was superior of the local communities.

As the Red Army approached, Sister Maria Adela decided to stay and care for the elderly women in her care. After Red Army soldiers took the village, she and her proteges found shelter at the farm of Maria and Paul Baum.

On February 25, 1945, a soldier broke into the house. Blessed Maria Adela, defending her accusations and her vowed chastity to God, was shot, along with her hosts and others staying there. All were buried in Godzieszów, in southwestern Poland, on the farmer’s property in a bomb crater, where later a plaque was erected to commemorate their deaths.

Blessed Sister Maria Adelheidis (Jadwiga) Töpfer.  Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.
Blessed Sister Maria Adelheidis (Jadwiga) Töpfer. Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.

Another victim of brutality by Soviet troops was Blessed Sister Maria Adelheidis (Jadwiga) Töpfershot down on March 24, 1945.

She was born in Nysa on August 26, 1887. She entered the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth in 1907 and made her perpetual profession on July 28, 1919.

She had great pedagogical skills and for many years she was a teacher and director of a housekeeping and handicraft school in Koźle, and from 1942 at St. George’s boarding school in Nysa.

In 1943 she was moved to St. Notburga House in Nysa. During the Soviet occupation of the city, the sick and the elderly took refuge with the sisters. Sister Maria Adelheidis stayed with them. Despite extremely difficult living conditions, she always found a place and offered help to those who needed it. She was the soul of the house.

As the soldiers wandered through the building, a Red Army man entered the room where the sister and her charges were staying. Provocatively, he showed his bleeding hand and asked who had fired from the room. Although everyone honestly denied it, he shot Sister Maria Adelheidis. His body was buried in the Jerusalem Cemetery at Nysa.

Blessed Sister Maria Felicitas (Anna Ellmerer).  Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.
Blessed Sister Maria Felicitas (Anna Ellmerer). Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.

Blessed Sister Maria Felicitas (Anna Ellmerer) was shot down at Nysa on March 25, 1945.

She was born on May 12, 1888 in Grafing, near Munich. She entered the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth, making her perpetual profession on July 5, 1923, working as a teacher and tutor in Düsseldorf, Kup and Nysa.

Soviet soldiers stationed in St. Elizabeth’s House constantly disturbed the sisters, who experienced days of fear and terror. The superior of the house begged them to leave the sisters alone. In response, she was struck with the butt of a rifle and knocked unconscious. Sister Maria Felicitas rushed to her aid. A soldier took advantage of this and tried to drag her out. As the sister defended herself and resisted, he fired a warning shot.

In response, Sister Maria Felicitas stood against the wall, stretched out her hands in the shape of a cross and shouted aloud, “Long live Christ the K…!” The last word was interrupted by a deadly bullet. The killer stomped on his victim’s head and chest with his heavy boots.

The sister’s mortal remains are buried in the monastery garden at 16 Słowiańska Street in Nysa.

A prayer for the necessary graces through the intercession of Blessed Mr. Paschalis and the Nine Companions:

Lord Jesus Christ crucified and risen,
You have strengthened Blessed Maria Paschalis and her Companions
sacrifice their lives.
By defending the dignity and chastity of a woman
as well as performing acts of mercy,
they remained faithful to you
to the shedding of blood.
May the example of their lives encourage us
to generous service to our brethren
and to the zealous fulfillment of your commandments.

Through their intercession, grant us the favors
that we ask you with confidence,
you who live and reign forever and ever.
Amen.

Our Father…Hail Mary…Glory be to the Father…

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Vatican picks in San Diego are making waves in the Roman Catholic Church https://parishchurch.org.uk/vatican-picks-in-san-diego-are-making-waves-in-the-roman-catholic-church/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 19:53:00 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/vatican-picks-in-san-diego-are-making-waves-in-the-roman-catholic-church/ Pope Francis’ decision to elevate two San Diego bishops to new leadership positions has some local Catholics saying the region is now “on the map” with the Vatican. On May 29, Bishop Robert McElroy was made a cardinal, part of an exclusive group that has a say in the future of the faith of more […]]]>

Pope Francis’ decision to elevate two San Diego bishops to new leadership positions has some local Catholics saying the region is now “on the map” with the Vatican.

On May 29, Bishop Robert McElroy was made a cardinal, part of an exclusive group that has a say in the future of the faith of more than 1.3 billion Roman Catholics around the world.

McElroy said he never imagined this unique date. At a press conference shortly after the announcement, he said he had “not the foggiest idea that was being considered or even possible.”

This came as a surprise not only to him but also to many San Diego residents.

“We announced it in church at all masses. Everyone rejoiced and clapped, so it was fantastic. It was good news,” said pastor Peter Navarra of St. -Joseph from downtown San Diego.

Navarra said for those who understand the church hierarchy, this selection is very off the charts.

“(Pope Francis) broke the format… the tradition (by) choosing Bishop McElroy, who is not an archbishop. He is the bishop of San Diego,” he said. “And that made it more special because San Diego is now on the map with the Vatican.”

McElroy was chosen from among the more conservative archbishops of major cities. A few weeks after this selection, Pope Francis again turned to San Diego to raise another church leader. Auxiliary Bishop John Dolan will leave San Diego in August to take charge of the Diocese of Phoenix, replacing an outgoing bishop known to be conservative.

“These are exciting and unpredictable wild days for San Diego,” said Michael Lovett-Colyer, mission integration manager at the University of San Diego. He said the fact that two like-minded leaders were placed in high-ranking positions in the church had significant implications, but said change started with Pope Francis.

“The earthquake was Pope Francis. The aftershocks are people like Bishop Dolan being elevated to bishop and Bishop McElroy becoming a cardinal,” Lovett-Colyer said. “Ten, 15 years ago, people like Bishop Dolan probably wouldn’t have been appointed bishop of his own diocese…Pope Francis has really changed expectations about who is worthy of this kind of role.”

Just days before being named bishop of Phoenix, Dolan said he was happy with McElroy’s selection as cardinal.

“(I’m) not surprised but delighted to know that this really couldn’t happen to a better person,” Dolan said.

He also responded to some of the criticism from hardliners of McElroy’s more liberal stances, such as his refusal to deny Communion to politicians who support abortion rights. Dolan said just like Pope Francis, McElroy will lead with his heart.

“It’s not that he’s trying to be conservative or liberal,” Dolan said. “He really tries to focus on being…a person who communicates all the time without drawing a line in the sand because that never really helps.”

Dolan said leading in this way does not mean church teachings are ignored or not followed. Instead, he said, people are treated with compassion and helped on their journey, rather than being shunned or viewed as outcasts.

Dolan also noted that McElroy’s pastoral sensibilities and heart go hand in hand with his intelligence and that McElroy has degrees from Harvard and Stanford to prove it.

Church insiders and McElroy say part of the reason he was selected was because of his work on three issues close to Pope Francis’ heart: immigration, inclusion and the environment. .

Dolan said McElroy would be the only cardinal on the West Coast and in a border town.

“That’s where he’s with people who are migrating, he’s with people who are immigrants, he’s with people who are refugees,” Dolan said, “and I think in many ways , San Diego is a perfect place to talk about this reality to proclaim this part of the gospel.”

Across the border in Tijuana, Father Patrick Murphy of migrant shelter Casa Del Migrante agrees. Murphy has worked with McElroy on migrant issues and has said in meetings that the cardinal-designate “was very open and really wanted to listen.”

“I think he realizes he needs to listen to learn before he can talk about a topic,” he said.

Murphy said McElroy’s selection is strong symbolism on the Pope’s part “because he has this phrase ‘reaching out to people on the periphery’ and to be on the frontier is to be on the periphery.”

Women have long been on the periphery of leadership in the Roman Catholic Church, but McElroy has brought about changes in San Diego, including appointing Maria Olivia Galvan as the first female chancellor and director of pastoral ministries in the diocese.

“To have a bishop (elevated to the rank of cardinal) in our diocese for the very first time – it is a historic moment and it is an occasion of momentous joy, not just for our diocese… It is a huge statement,” Galvan said.

She said more women are being appointed to leadership positions, “but this is far from a reality in all dioceses and archdioceses.”

“And so to see that and have that vision, he’s a visionary,” Galvan said.

The environment is another topic of great concern to the pope, and McElroy has worked on this issue for Pope Francis. McElroy has also exposed climate change deniers and worked in the Amazon; something unique for a bishop in the church.

“It’s great to have a voice for San Diego in this position,” said Mitch Silverstein of the Surfrider Foundation. He said people of all faiths and beliefs are welcome in the effort to protect the environment, and that it is important to have allies in leadership positions.

“Having people in leadership positions in the Catholic faith in all faiths and all sectors of our society who are environmentalists,” he said. “I think it’s just crucial for us all to come together to save our planet.”

More than a third of the residents of San Diegan are Roman Catholic. That includes San Diego City Council member Raul Campillo, who represents District 7, which stretches from Lake Murray to Linda Vista – home to SHU, a Catholic university. He said this selection was meaningful to him and to the people he represents.

“It speaks volumes about the message of Pope Francis from the very beginning of his papacy…who cares for the vulnerable and finds the people who have been cast out of the church and brings them back to the center and back to the heart,” said Campillo.

Ultimately, said SHU’s Lovette-Colyer, this kind of pastoral leadership will help usher in a new generation that hasn’t seen themselves or their friends accepted into the church.

“People in these roles who operate in this way, who have these qualities, are often seen – especially by young people – as incredibly relevant, incredible and authentic witnesses,” he said. “And therefore they are very effective in bringing attention to the church in a new way or maybe even getting involved in a deeper way.”

McElroy will travel to Rome in August where he will be installed by Pope Francis. Then he will return to San Diego to continue his work, with the new title of Cardinal.

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The Catholic Church will organize a mass burial for the victims of the terrorist attack in Ondo https://parishchurch.org.uk/the-catholic-church-will-organize-a-mass-burial-for-the-victims-of-the-terrorist-attack-in-ondo/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 08:21:14 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/the-catholic-church-will-organize-a-mass-burial-for-the-victims-of-the-terrorist-attack-in-ondo/ St Francis Catholic Church at Owa-luwa Street in Owo Local Government Area of ​​Ondo State is set to conduct a mass burial for the victims of the terrorist attack on the Sunday church.During the Pentecost service on Sunday, terrorists invaded the church killing dozens of worshippers, while several others were injured. One of the videos […]]]>

St Francis Catholic Church at Owa-luwa Street in Owo Local Government Area of ​​Ondo State is set to conduct a mass burial for the victims of the terrorist attack on the Sunday church.
During the Pentecost service on Sunday, terrorists invaded the church killing dozens of worshippers, while several others were injured.





One of the videos of the incident obtained by SaharaReporters shows that children were also killed in the attack.
The attack had drawn sympathy from different sections of society, both in Nigeria and abroad, with many urging the country’s security apparatus to be active in protecting lives and property.
On Monday, the church said it was ready to carry out a mass burial of the victims but promised to hand over the bodies to families who wanted to claim them.
Church catechist Donatus Awololo said the victims were rushed to different hospitals, including Federal Medical Center Owo, St Louis Catholic Hospital and some private hospitals.
He was grateful to God that he too survived the attack.
Meanwhile, a source in the area informed SaharaReporters that there was palpable fear in the community as parents refused to release their children/wards to go to school. He said that by next week, university activities could resume in the region.
The source, who has lost all connection with the attack, said church activities have also been suspended for the time being, especially as the attackers were targeting a large cathedral in the area.

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Coat of arms of the bishop of the Catholic Church steeped in medieval heraldry https://parishchurch.org.uk/coat-of-arms-of-the-bishop-of-the-catholic-church-steeped-in-medieval-heraldry/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 15:21:04 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/coat-of-arms-of-the-bishop-of-the-catholic-church-steeped-in-medieval-heraldry/ Bishop David Toups was on a plane to Florida, returning from his presentation to members of the Diocese of Beaumont as the sixth bishop, when he began sketching out the idea for his personal coat of arms. The symbol would soon mark the crest representing the diocese of Beaumont after his ordination on August 21, […]]]>

Bishop David Toups was on a plane to Florida, returning from his presentation to members of the Diocese of Beaumont as the sixth bishop, when he began sketching out the idea for his personal coat of arms. The symbol would soon mark the crest representing the diocese of Beaumont after his ordination on August 21, 2020.

It is a duty with which every bishop of the Roman Catholic Church has been charged for over a thousand years – part of an ancient heraldic tradition dating back to the Middle Ages.

“There’s a lot of continuity and deep symbolic meaning” in the practice, Toups said.


Just as families in medieval times had a coat of arms to distinguish them in times of battle or celebration, bishops designed coats of arms depicting their lives as they were called to lead their diocesan family, Toups explained.

It’s a tradition that Toups never expected to be part of, until he received a call from the papal nuncio informing him that Pope Francis had named him as the next bishop of the diocese of Beaumont, following a papal acceptance of Bishop Curtis Guillory’s retirement after 20 years. years at the head of the diocese.

At the time, Toups was rector and president of St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Clearwater, Florida.

He had been enmeshed in seminary and university life for about 20 years.

The move would require leaving the world of spiritual teaching for that of spiritual direction – not just in one church, but in a consortium of 49 parishes in nine counties serving nearly 70,000 Catholics throughout the Golden Triangle.

Its home base would be the Basilica-Cathedral of Saint Anthony, a historic site created in 1907 whose roots date back to 1879.

It was a life-changing decision – a Toups asked to be considered with the consultation of spiritual advisors.

“What is there to consider?” Toups remembers the papal nuncio asking. “The pope appointed you.”

Toups reflected on his longtime favorite Bible verse – “To those who love God, all things work together for good,” Romans 8:28.

“It happened to be my family’s favorite verse and the first verse I ever experienced,” Toups said.

Speaking to then-Bishop Curtis Guillory during a first visit, Toups learned that the verse was actually the motto for the Bishop of Guillory’s personal crest.

That’s when he knew the date was fate.

“We call it divine incidence,” Toups said during his introduction to the community of priests in the diocese on June 9, 2020.

As he set out to create the ridge that would adjoin the diocesan ridge, he considered his personal history, his deep roots in the southern Gulf Coast, and a spiritual life rooted in academia.

Toups had created a family crest years ago, “so heraldry wasn’t new to me,” he said.

But part of it would resonate with members of Beaumont parishes – the motto.

“It is unusual to carry a motto” from one bishop to another, Toups noted, “but it shows the continuity of Bishop Guillory and me. It was a beautiful sign of providence.”

From there, however, personal crests diverge.

That of Bishop Guillory was surrounded by the colors of Africa – red, green and black – in which were encrusted personal symbols, such as a strand of cotton referring to his descent from sharecroppers.

The crest of Bishop Toups would signify a story imbued with its own layers of symbolic figures and colors.

Its background colors are red, yellow and blue, their meaning being specified in the diocesan documents.

Red represents the color of blood, especially the blood of Jesus, which was shed for all in the ultimate act of love.

Gold symbolizes nobility and the first virtue, faith, “which helps us to believe in God’s plan of salvation”.

The color blue “symbolizes the separation from worldly values ​​and the ascent of the soul to God”.

Silver “is the second of the noble metals and is displayed in white, which symbolizes the purity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, which all Christians share through the gift of sanctification”.

The rules of ecclesiastical heraldry state that in a coat of arms color cannot be laid on color nor metal on metal.

At the top left of the crest is a gold feather on a red background. It’s a feather-shaped plume – part of the old Dubs (Toups) family crest that serves as a reminder of family lineage – but also a nod to the fact that “much of my priesthood was spent in academia, in the intellectual side of the church,” notes Toups.

“The plume/feather represents the importance of the intellectual search for truth and (my) desire to be a faithful and true shepherd,” he added.

Toups was inspired by Mother Teresa’s statement that she was simply “a pencil in the hand of God, but he is the one who writes”.

Next to this image, in contrasting hues, is a red lion set in the middle of a gold plane.

The lion comes from a symbol for the diocese of Saint Petersburg, where Toups was first ordained a priest in 1997.

It also refers to his middle name – Léon, after his father – and therefore renders his coat of arms “canting”, or heraldic bearings which represent the bearer’s name. The lion also symbolizes courage, “which the bishop asks God to pour upon him as he embraces the office of bishop,” according to diocesan documentation.

At the bottom of the shield is a pelican – a bird featured on the Louisiana flag of Toups’ youth in recognition of his upbringing in Houma, Louisiana – feeding his chicks.

Its silver wings spread out amid a base of blue, and in its chest, three drops of blood rest beneath the pelican’s dipping beak as it prepares to feed its young.

In symbolic reference to the Eucharist, “the pelican in times of famine would pinch its chest and feed the chicks with their own flesh so that they would not die,” Toups explained.

The image, attributed to Saint Thomas Aquinas, is “a powerful and ancient symbol of Jesus, who, to prevent us from starving, serves us with his flesh and blood. This image serves as the base/foundation of the entire shield to remind us all that the Eucharist is the “source and summit” of our lives as Catholic Christians,” according to diocesan documents explaining the Toups crest. .

On a personal level, the three chicks represent Toups, his 2 older siblings and “the sacrifice parents make for their children,” he said.

Set in the middle of a base of blue, its meaning elevates to that representing Toups’ movement from an earthly family to his extended family as a servant of God.

In the center of his coat of arms is a silver star.

“It is a symbol of Mary, star of the sea guiding sailors to safety as the patroness of storms,” Toups explained.

It is a symbol that has not escaped anyone in the history of hurricanes and devastating storms of the Golden Triangle.

But it further represents Bishop Toups’ wish to “entrust his new pastoral service to the protection and guiding light of the Blessed Virgin Mary…and an important symbol of his new home in Texas, ‘the State of ‘lone star'”, according to Diocesan Documents.

After his enthronement as bishop, Toups’ personal coat of arms was joined to one that has long represented the diocese of Beaumont – what is known as “marshaling” in heraldic tradition.

The left half, or heart, of the diocesan coat of arms has been passed down through six generations of pastoral leadership.

Its symbolism is worn on the vestments of priests during diocese-wide services, such as the Chrism Mass celebrated on Tuesdays of Holy Week and is part of the imagery decorating the metal doors of the basilica.

On a base of blue is a golden vase inscribed with the Greek letters X (Chi) and P (Rho) – the monogram of Christ, the “X” meaning “the anointed”, Toups said.

Above are two flowers representing descent from the Diocese of Beaumont of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston; a star in between refers to the “Lone Star State”.

The vessel depicts what “holds the sacred oils used in the administration of the sacraments,” Toups explained, but also acknowledges the area’s role as the “origins of oil in Southeast Texas – a mountain of ‘or, a Beau Mont’.

Although the word originates from the maiden name of the city’s founder, its symbolic meaning has remained and has its place in the complex layered imagery of its later diocesan nomenclature.

The coat of arms of the bishop and of the diocese form a shield unified by a golden processional cross adorned with five red gems symbolizing the wounds of Christ during the crucifixion.

At the top of the cross is a green hat from which flows on each side a total of six.

They represent the stature of the crest bearer within the Catholic hierarchy.

Designing his coat of arms was just one step towards Toups taking on his new role on a journey of loyal service.

It was a learning curve helped by other bishops.

One pointed him to the talents of Renato Poletti – a member of the Italian government who takes up ecclesiastical heraldry as a hobby – to create the final design of his coat of arms from Toups’ early sketches.

Another bishop advised him to a jeweler in Pittsburgh to create the bishop’s ring that would bear the seal of his crest.

And it was Toup’s sister, Vicki Sheaffer, who suggested that he use their parents’ wedding rings as the base metal for this piece.

It was all part of the heraldry that would lead to his installment as the sixth Bishop of Beaumont in a place he would now call home.

“I really feel at home here in Southeast Texas,” Toups said, noting that a ward member created the crest-embroidered capes that now cover the shoulders of servers who help him during mass. .

“It was a nice little touch” to his installment as the next bishop, Toups said, which made him feel welcome in the community he now calls home — a home he felt in. called to serve.

“I like being in a small diocese. It’s like being the pastor of a big parish, and I feel like that’s good,” Toups said. “This is where God wanted me to be.”

kbrent@beaumontenterprise.com

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Father Kibuuka: Why I broke ties with the Catholic Church https://parishchurch.org.uk/father-kibuuka-why-i-broke-ties-with-the-catholic-church/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/father-kibuuka-why-i-broke-ties-with-the-catholic-church/ It is a Thursday afternoon that I face the dusty grounds of the village of Jjanda in the district of Namugongo-Wakiso to meet the priest recently beatified to become bishop. To arrange the interview, Bishop Jacinto Kibuuka is only a phone call away from his personal media assistant. At his new pastoral station, it becomes […]]]>

It is a Thursday afternoon that I face the dusty grounds of the village of Jjanda in the district of Namugongo-Wakiso to meet the priest recently beatified to become bishop.

To arrange the interview, Bishop Jacinto Kibuuka is only a phone call away from his personal media assistant. At his new pastoral station, it becomes immediately apparent that the man of God has many people vying for his attention.

“I’m glad you’re here but I apologize for not looking after you because I have to look after many Christians after a busy day. Please don’t worry about transportation as I have requested Alex, my driver, to take you back to the office,” he humbly apologizes.

My next appointment is penciled in for a Saturday afternoon. I endure the same journey. The second meeting gives me the opportunity to have another look at the place and to exchange with the people who live with the man of God.

What I didn’t see initially was that the place has a lot of the same things as the Roman Catholic Church. Paintings signifying the Stations of the Cross, an emerging grotto and cross, and most importantly, an altar before which many arriving Christians bow before making the sign of the cross.

This time, I get an audience with Bishop Kibuuka who gives me a broad smile to welcome me.
“You look hungry,” he asks me half in Luganda before placing an order for me through one of his assistants.

The help must now go to a restaurant which is a few kilometers away. Clearly, this affable man of God – who also studied psychology – is trying to buy time to tend to his flock. When we finally get to the interview, two hours later, his story about the controversial departure from the Roman Catholic Church in 2016 feels eerily familiar.

He begins by telling me about his childhood, the time when he was a priest in the Roman Catholic Church and how he ended up in Mamré. This follows his dismissal by a man who educated him at university level, housed him and mentored him. So, is he still a priest?

“I am a priest and it is a gift that cannot be taken away from me, and I am a Catholic, even though I have ceased to adhere to the Roman Catholic sect”, he explains.
Dressed in liturgical vestments, Bishop Kibuuka opens up about his departure from the highest religious attire.

He says he was removed from his position in a strange way.
Asked to stay away from any pastoral activity and sentenced to 10 years in what he describes as a “solitary” establishment in Ggoli without a telephone, Bishop Kibuuka still seems hurt. He is currently the head of the Eastern Orthodox Church of Antioch in Uganda.

leave catholicism
It was in 2016 when a woman identified as Winfred Nantongo came out in the media to say she was involved in a sexual relationship with Father Kibuuka. When the woman apologized for tarnishing Father Kibuuka’s image, it was supposed to end the story. He does not have.

“I was expelled from the Church on unsubstantiated allegations and the decision was blocked because my accusers had no evidence against me,” he says, adding: “At one point, I remember ‘a monsignor, who wrote a dossier which he read in my presence. Part of it stated that I should be expelled from the country.

After being transferred from Rubaga to Bukalango, he was granted administrative leave.

“Cardinal [Emmanuel] Wamala and Bishop Kakooza intervened many times to block my dismissal, but at some point it got away from them,” he recalls.

One day, November 14, 2014, particularly stood out. Summoned to the archdiocese, he was relieved of his duties. Less than an hour after his suspension, Archbishop of Kampala Cyprian Kizito Lwanga (RIP) revoked the decision.

Sentenced to solitary confinement
Before his dismissal in July 2016, Kibuuka says he saw it coming. This inevitability forced him to plan his exit. Bishop Kibuuka notes that he received a letter from Bishop Lwanga indicating that he had been relieved of his pastoral duties. The letter also allegedly ordered him to go and remain incommunicado at Ggoli convent in Mpigi district in a Roman Catholic facility for 10 years.

All he could think of at the time was his elderly mother. When he was ordained a priest, Bishop Kibuuka was greeted with a lot of responsibility.
“At the time I was 37 and that meant I would be serving time for a crime I hadn’t known existed for 10 years and would return at 47.

My mother, friends, family and dependents would be badly affected,” he says, adding, “The only person who knows why I was expelled from the Roman Catholic Church is Archbishop Lwanga, but I forgave him and took another path to serve God.

talk about being single
When he stood before the tabernacle in 2008, Bishop Kibuuka agreed to serve God. He adds that he respected and observed celibacy all his years at the altar of the Roman Catholic Church.

“Many church leaders practice celibacy during the day, but the most important thing is to be true to yourself. We should stay away from pretense,” he says, adding, “There are two things you can’t hide: love and drunkenness.

He says that the writings of the apostle Paul on the subject are explicit. Paul specifies that “those who marry are not guilty of sin; those who burn with sexual passion should get married instead of being in a constant struggle with immorality.

The road ahead
Before falling into a stalemate in the Roman Catholic Church, Bishop Kibuuka knew the worst was about to happen. So, on June 31, 2016, he decided that he was going to remain a servant of God. This is how the idea of ​​the Prayer Center of Mamré was born, which he created discreetly. He was soon joined by two priests. We would later return to the Roman Catholic Church.

He says the prayer center which has spawned churches in all parts of the country was started with 20 million shillings raised by Christians to buy seven acres of land in Namugongo.
The prayer center now has 33 priests, nuns, hundreds of catechists, 60 seminarians and thousands of faithful. He says that soon a church building will be established, along with other branches of the Antiochian Rite, which is apostolic in nature. He also established a seminary that trains priests and other religious leaders.

Growing up
Unlike many homes in their village of Ssemukombe in Mpigi District, Bishop Kibuuka did not grow up in a mud and acacia hut. His parents, he adds, worked hard to care for their children. Her best childhood memory was when Cardinal Emmanuel Nsubuga came to their village to command Kawumba sub-parish, which was her childhood church.
The cardinal showed up at 8 p.m., 11 hours after he was originally expected. Not that it dampened the moods.
“The Cardinal arrived in a red Benz and we asked the driver to turn off the engine and we drove him to the church,” he recalled, adding: “The Cardinal was dressed in a long dress and I remember people calling him “Kapamaanya” and there were boys holding him like peg boys.”

Join the Priesthood
Remarkably, a smoke pipe is what prompted Bishop Kibuuka to join the priesthood. Well, in a way. He was always intrigued to see his father smoking a pipe. His grandfather, however, forbade him to touch the smoke pipe.
However, when a Father John of the Missionaries of Africa showed up with another on a visit to their home church, Bishop Kibuuka gave in to his temptations.

“I asked Father John to allow me to touch his smoke pipe and when my mother saw me she beat me,” he recalled, adding: “The priest stopped her. saw my very humble mother in the presence of a priest and realized that being a priest was a special gift.

He also reveals that at one point he considered becoming a politician and was inspired by President Museveni and former army commander General Mugisha Muntu.

Bishop Jacinto Kibuuka is the 7th child in the family of eight children of the late Richard Francis Kalyesubula and Mary Leticia Nantume Kalyesubula of Ssemukombe-Mawokota in Mpigi District.

Born on August 17, 1978, he studied at St Theresa Kawumba and later joined St Balikuddembe Mitala Maria for secondary education. He went through St Mbaaga Seminary, where he studied philosophy and theology and other studies.
After being ordained a Catholic priest in 2008 at Rubaga Cathedral in Kampala, Kibuuka earned a master’s degree in health education and promotion from Nkozi University.
On November 12, 2017, he was ordained as the first Bishop of the Central and Eastern Orthodox Church of Antioch at its Mamre International Prayer Center in Namugongo, Wakiso District.
Kibuuka, who currently heads the Mamre Prayer Center, is also the head of the Eastern Orthodox Church of Antioch in Uganda.

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News from the Queen: Catholic Church leader impressed by monarch’s ‘stability and depth’ | royal | New https://parishchurch.org.uk/news-from-the-queen-catholic-church-leader-impressed-by-monarchs-stability-and-depth-royal-new/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 15:40:00 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/news-from-the-queen-catholic-church-leader-impressed-by-monarchs-stability-and-depth-royal-new/ Cardinal Vincent Nichols, head of the Catholic Church in England and Wales, told Andrew Pierce on LBC he was in awe of the “amazing” Queen. On the third day of his Platinum Jubilee, celebrating 70 years on the throne, Cardinal Nichols said the monarch had brought “stability and depth” to the nation. He said his […]]]>

Cardinal Vincent Nichols, head of the Catholic Church in England and Wales, told Andrew Pierce on LBC he was in awe of the “amazing” Queen. On the third day of his Platinum Jubilee, celebrating 70 years on the throne, Cardinal Nichols said the monarch had brought “stability and depth” to the nation. He said his “sacrifice” in giving himself to the country was made “without hesitation”.

Cardinal Nichols said: “The queen is amazing. What she brings is stability, depth, and that fine example of serve.

“And I think it’s that sense of service that goes beyond self. This is not uncommon in our society.

“A lot of people sacrifice their own lives for their children, for their loved ones, but here we have someone who has done it consistently without hesitation.

“And that makes us wonder how she does it? What about her?

“She’s got a lot of support but there’s something deep inside her that gives her that stability.”

Queen Elizabeth’s son and heir, Prince Charles, and grandson, Prince William, will pay their respects to the record-breaking monarch later today.

She is not expected to attend the event, having already missed a number of other events due to health issues.

During a pop concert at Buckingham Palace on the third day of national celebrations for his 70th anniversary on the throne, Prince Charles will pay tribute to the monarch.

The ‘Party at the Palace’, which will feature singers Alicia Keys and Diana Ross, is the main Platinum Jubilee event today, along with the Epsom Derby horse race.

READ MORE: Carol Kirkwood horrified as she is bitten by the Queen’s ‘special’ pony [REPORT]

During Friday’s National Thanksgiving Service at St Paul’s Cathedral in London, Archbishop of York Stephen Cottrell used a horse racing analogy in his sermon to pay homage to the Queen.

He said: “Your Majesty, we are sorry that you are not here with us this morning, but we are so happy that you are still in the saddle. And we are happy that there is still more to come. So thank you to stay the course.”

A sideshow to the main celebrations was Prince Harry and his American wife Meghan making their first public appearance together in Britain since leaving official duties to move to Los Angeles two years ago.

Notably on Saturday, the official Twitter accounts of the monarch, Charles and William all sent messages almost simultaneously to mark the first birthday of Lilibet, the couple’s daughter who is named after the Queen.

Elizabeth had not met her great-granddaughter before the trip, and Buckingham Palace has not commented on newspaper reports that they were eventually introduced.

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The Catholic Church needs LGBT saints https://parishchurch.org.uk/the-catholic-church-needs-lgbt-saints/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 13:58:34 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/the-catholic-church-needs-lgbt-saints/ America recently launched a national marketing campaign called #OwnYourFaith. This article is part of a series of essays addressing questions that many Catholics have about the Church and the world. It’s time to #OwnYourFaith. Subscribe to America. I like a large painting of saints — 15, 20, 30 people surrounding Mary or Jesus and facing […]]]>

America recently launched a national marketing campaign called #OwnYourFaith. This article is part of a series of essays addressing questions that many Catholics have about the Church and the world. It’s time to #OwnYourFaith. Subscribe to America.

I like a large painting of saints — 15, 20, 30 people surrounding Mary or Jesus and facing us, their heads framed by yellow halos like the sun. It’s like seeing members of the Justice League or the X-Men all together. There’s this game of trying to see if you can recognize them all, remember their stories and their superpowers. But for me, it’s also reassuring to see them all together. Especially if they include more than single white men, it feels like a glimpse into the kingdom of God, a home where there’s a place for all of us.

But a few years ago, I was at Our Lady of the Angels Cathedral in Los Angeles, showing friends the beautiful tapestries of saints that line the walls of the church. Created by artist John Nava, they are simply extraordinary, young and old, Europeans, Africans, Asians, Latin Americans and Indigenous, women and men who surround us and look with us towards God.

When LGBT people watch the Communion of Saints, we should be able to see someone who looks like us.

As I sat in the church with my guests, looking at all these beautiful pictures, I suddenly realized that none of these people had identified as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender, although some of them did. between them undoubtedly were. In fact, the Catholic Church has yet to recognize a single LGBT saint.

Now, depending on how you were raised, just the fact that I raise this as an issue may seem outrageous. Honestly, I instinctively feel that way myself, and I’m gay. Regardless of the work that Pope Francis, various bishops, clergy and others have done to try to normalize the place of LGBT people in the church, the fact is that for many Catholics of a certain age, being always LGBT seems evil or disobedient. This is just the way the church has often tried to talk about LGBT people: “Love the sinner, hate the sin.” Those who use this phrase claim that it is clear that the problem with us is not our identity, but our actions and our desires. But the line only identifies LGBT people as sinners. He teaches people to love us In any event. And when you hear that enough as an LGBT person, you start believing the same thing.

So yes, by suggesting that it is a problem that there are no LGBT saints, I feel like I am saying something transgressive. But the fact is that as Catholics we believe that each of us is born in the image and likeness of God. Not just straight people, white people or men, everyone. There is no asterisk in the Catechism on this point. This is the teaching of the Church, even if some Catholics discuss or treat us in a way that suggests otherwise.

As Catholics, we believe that each of us is born in the image and likeness of God. Not just straight people, white people or men, everyone.

It is this truth of our faith, in fact, that enabled Francis to say, when asked a question about homosexual priests: “If a homosexual person is in ardent search of God, who am I? to judge him? This has allowed him to praise the work of organizations like Ministry of New Ways and people like Jeannine Gramick, SL, and my colleague James Martin, SJ, all of whom have served LGBT Catholics, in Sister Gramick’s case, for over 50 years; or to invite a group of transgender people to the Vatican to receive their Covid vaccine; or to restore the openly gay theologian, Father James Alison, to active ministry after two decades of what He described as a “Kafkaesque” nightmare in which he was not allowed to know what the charges were against him, was unable to make legal representation of his case, and was not allowed to appeal. If we are children of God like everyone else, then we should receive the same care and respect as they do. “Know that God made you, that God loves you and that God is on your side” Cardinal Joseph Tobin and 13 other U.S. archbishops and bishops have written in a statement last December, addressing young LGBT people.

But there is more than respect and love. To say that God created us or that we are created in the image of God is to say that we offer insight into who God is, that we are each a means by which other people can know that they too are an image of God, seen and loved by Him. It is an incredible statement, to think that any of us could be such a gift, a means by which others could know God and themselves better. And yet, we believe it is true for all human beings.

There are so many LGBT people who have dedicated their lives to being that kind of hope and solace for others. Like New York Fire Department Chaplain and Franciscan Priest Mychal Judge, who died on 9/11 while cheering on rescuers in the lobby of the World Trade Center’s North Tower. During his lifetime, Father Judge established one of the first ministries in New York to serve people living with HIV or AIDS. He advocated for the homeless and cared for alcoholics after coming through AA himself. And for the last 10 years of his life, he worked as a chaplain for the New York Fire Department. He was gay, he helped a lot of people and now they talk about how he inspired them. And there is a growing demand for his canonization.

Those of us who are LGBT and Catholic know all too well the difficulties that come with self-acceptance and the compassion it teaches.

Or take the Dutch theologian Father Henri Nouwen. His spiritual writings have helped millions connect with God. And after decades of teaching at Yale and Harvard theological schools, he dedicated the latter part of his life to living and working with adults with disabilities in L’Arche communities. His life was a profound testimony of service, simplicity and friendship.

Nouwen has never publicly identified as gay; from his journals, it is clear that his continued struggle to integrate his sexuality into his life was a difficult burden that he did not resolve until his later years. And yet, it was also clearly a driving force for his ministry, something that enabled him to speak to people in difficulty with insight and empathy.

Those of us who are LGBT and Catholic know all too well the difficulties that come with self-acceptance and the compassion it teaches. Who better to be a saint than someone who has walked this path?

I hope it’s clear that I don’t think naming saints should be limited to giving a community a saint “our own”. Nouwen and Judge have dedicated their lives to helping a wide range of people, and they have been recognized as saints by them. Their holiness is not a function of their sexuality but of the gift they have been for the whole Church.

At the same time, it is also worth saying that it is difficult to be an LGBT Catholic. I’m sure some Catholics are fed up with us throwing out “Who am I to judge?” by Pope Francis. But for many of us, Francis’ statement was the first time in our lives that we had received some sort of public permission to exist as ourselves in the church.

As we examine Church history, we might reconsider the stories of Saint Brigid and Sister Darlughdach, who resided together, worked together, and shared a bed; of St. John Henry Newman and Father Ambrose St. John, who lived together for 32 years and shared a grave, or of Venerable Juana Inés de la Cruz, who believed that God had changed her gender in the womb of her mother and imagined that Jesus could be mother or father, wife or husband, according to the needs of those who seek him. But our real existence in church history has never been acknowledged, nor the blessings we might have brought. Nowhere will we find statues of people like us. We are not included in any Catholic chart. At best, we are only guests in the history of salvation. More often we are like Abraham’s second wife, Hagar, exiled to another country.

While the ways they might describe themselves in earlier eras would be different, LGBT people have been part of the church since its inception. Some have contributed to his mission in inspiring and holy ways. And in many cases, like Nouwen, they did so silently carrying a terrible burden. It is time they had their place in the history of the church.

When LGBT people watch the Communion of Saints, we should be able to see someone who looks like us. And it’s not because of who we are, but because of who these individuals were and what they did.

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Attacks against the Catholic Church multiply following the leak of the Supreme Court | National Catholic Registry https://parishchurch.org.uk/attacks-against-the-catholic-church-multiply-following-the-leak-of-the-supreme-court-national-catholic-registry/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 02:42:14 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/attacks-against-the-catholic-church-multiply-following-the-leak-of-the-supreme-court-national-catholic-registry/ According to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, there have been at least 134 incidents in 35 states and Washington, DC, since May 2020. U.S. bishops have begun to notice — and track — an increasing number of attacks targeting Catholic churches in 2020. In recent weeks, following the leak of a Supreme Court […]]]>

According to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, there have been at least 134 incidents in 35 states and Washington, DC, since May 2020.

U.S. bishops have begun to notice — and track — an increasing number of attacks targeting Catholic churches in 2020. In recent weeks, following the leak of a Supreme Court draft in a highly expected, this number has accelerated.

The May 2 leak of a draft Supreme Court opinion in the abortion case Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization suggests judges prepare to overturn Roe vs. Wadewho legalized abortion nationwide in 1973.

Abortion supporters and groups have long criticized the teaching of the Catholic Church that abortion kills an unborn human person with inherent dignity and worth. At the same time, pro-abortion groups such as Ruth Sent Us – which has called for church disruption following the leak – have complained that the majority of judges are Catholic.

According to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, which tracks of arson, vandalism and other destruction occurring at US Catholic churches, there have been at least 134 incidents in 35 states and Washington, DC, since May 2020.

Their list does not yet include the latest reported incident at a Brooklyn parish.

May 27, 2022: New York

A gold tabernacle estimated by police at $2 million has been stolen from St. Augustine’s Catholic Church in Brooklyn. The Diocese of Brooklyn too revealed on May 29 that “the Holy Eucharist lodged inside the Tabernacle was thrown all over the altar”.

The diocese said the burglar “cut a protective metal casing” to take the late 19th-century tabernacle on or around May 27. A safe in the sacristy had also been opened, but it was empty.

The angels on both sides of the tabernacle, the diocese added, “have been beheaded and destroyed.”

According to the diocese, the New York Police Department is investigating the crime of “disrespect and hate”.

May 22, 2022: Washington

The Archdiocese of Seattle confirmed to CNA that St. Michael’s Parish at Olympia was vandalized with the words “Abandon the Church” spray-painted on a wall on May 22. On a post from Puget Sound Anarchists, Jane’s Revenge Bo Brown Memorial Cell claimed responsibility for the attackas well as attacks on three other non-Catholic churches.

May 19, 2022: Florida

10 relics have disappeared from St. Elizabeth Seton Catholic Church in Naples, Florida, a CBS affiliate, WINK, reported. The relics include a piece of Christ’s cross, a piece of Saint Joseph’s garment, a piece of the Virgin Mary’s veil, and bone fragments of several saints.

While the local sheriff’s office said it could not verify whether the items were stolen or lost, the church believes it is unlikely someone misplaced them.

May 17, 2022: New York

Vandals have beheaded and shattered statues in a Our Lady of Fatima grotto at Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church in New York, according to a media advisory from the Archdiocese of New York.

May 9, 2022: Texas

In Katy, Texas, a Catholic priest said someone tried to desecrate the Eucharist at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church. A local Fox Affiliate reported Father Peter Damian Harris, pastor of Holy Rosary Catholic Church in Houston, speaking of the May 9 incident.

May 8, 2022: California, Texas, Washington

Protesters interrupted mass just before communion at Our Lady of the Angels Cathedral in Los Angeles, California. The women, dressed in red dresses and large white hats, shouted and unfurled a banner before being escorted out of the church.

In Katy, Texas, another tabernacle was stolen on the night of May 8 from St. Bartholomew the Apostle Catholic Church. Although an arrest has been made in connection with the theft, the tabernacle remains missing.

Still in Texas, the graffiti reading “Pro-choice is pro-life” was spray painted on the front and side doors of Holy Rosary Catholic Church in Houston.

In Washington State, Post-millennium journalist Kate Daviscourt capture on video protesters lying on the steps of St. James Cathedral in Seattle with fake blood on them to mimic coat hanger abortions during mass. The incident involved a heated confrontation between a security guard and protesters, also captured in a video uploaded by The Post Millennial.

May 7, 2022: Colorado, New York

St. John XXIII Parish in Fort Collins, Colo., was tagged with graffiti on May 7, police say. Messages including “My body my choice” and a symbol that appears to be an “A” meaning “anarchy” were written on the church. Some of the church’s exterior glass panels were also shattered.

In New York, pro-abortion protesters gathered outside Old St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Lower Manhattan. The protest disrupted a monthly pro-life procession from the church to the local Planned Parenthood. Among other things, a Franciscan monk was heckled and a woman in a padded bathing suit danced in front of the church pretending to abort dolls.

The church’s pastor, Father Brian Graebe, later told Fox News“We received a number of threats to bomb the church, to set it on fire.”

May 3, 2022: Colorado

Sacred Heart of Mary Catholic Church in Boulder, Colorado has been defaced with pro-abortion slogans including “My body, my choice”, marking the second time in less than a year that the parish is targeted by such graffiti.

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Attacks on Catholic churches increase following Supreme Court leak – Catholic World Report https://parishchurch.org.uk/attacks-on-catholic-churches-increase-following-supreme-court-leak-catholic-world-report/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 01:33:38 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/attacks-on-catholic-churches-increase-following-supreme-court-leak-catholic-world-report/ The damaged altar of St. Augustine’s Catholic Church in Brooklyn, New York, NY / DeSales Media Group Washington, DC Newsroom, May 31, 2022 / 5:49 p.m. (CNA). U.S. bishops have begun to notice — and track — an increasing number of attacks targeting Catholic churches in 2020. In recent weeks, following the leak of a […]]]>
The damaged altar of St. Augustine’s Catholic Church in Brooklyn, New York, NY / DeSales Media Group

Washington, DC Newsroom, May 31, 2022 / 5:49 p.m. (CNA).

U.S. bishops have begun to notice — and track — an increasing number of attacks targeting Catholic churches in 2020. In recent weeks, following the leak of a Supreme Court draft in a highly expected, this number has accelerated.

May 2nd Supreme Court draft opinion leaked in the case of abortion Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization suggests judges prepare to overturn Roe v. Wade, who legalized abortion nationwide in 1973.

Abortion supporters and groups have long criticized the teaching of the Catholic Church that abortion kills an unborn human person with inherent dignity and worth. At the same time, pro-abortion groups such as Ruth sent us – who has called for church disruption in the wake of the leak – complained that the majority of judges are Catholic.

According to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, which tracks of arson, vandalism and other destruction occurring at US Catholic churches, there have been at least 134 incidents in 35 states and Washington, DC, since May 2020.

Their list does not yet include the latest reported incident at a Brooklyn parish.

May 27, 2022: New York

A gold tabernacle estimated by the police at 2 million dollars has been stolen of St. Augustine’s Catholic Church in Brooklyn. The Diocese of Brooklyn too revealed on May 29 that “the Holy Eucharist lodged inside the Tabernacle was thrown all over the altar”.

The diocese said the burglar “cut a protective metal casing” to take the late 19th-century tabernacle on or around May 27. A safe in the sacristy had also been opened, but it was empty.

The angels on both sides of the tabernacle, the diocese added, “have been beheaded and destroyed.”

According to the diocese, the New York Police Department is investigating the crime of “disrespect and hate”.

May 22, 2022: Washington

The Archdiocese of Seattle confirmed to CNA that St. Michael’s Parish at Olympia was vandalized with the words “Abandon the Church” spray-painted on a wall on May 22. On a post from Puget Sound Anarchists, Jane’s Revenge Bo Brown Memorial Cell claimed responsibility for the attackas well as attacks on three other non-Catholic churches.

May 19, 2022: Florida

10 relics have disappeared from St. Elizabeth Seton Catholic Church in Naples, Florida, a CBS affiliate, WINK, reported. The relics include a piece of Christ’s cross, a piece of Saint Joseph’s garment, a piece of the Virgin Mary’s veil, and bone fragments of several saints.

While the local sheriff’s office said it could not verify whether the items were stolen or lost, the church believes it is unlikely someone misplaced them.

May 17, 2022: New York

Vandals have beheaded and shattered statues in a Our Lady of Fatima grotto at Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church in New York, according to a media advisory from the Archdiocese of New York.

May 9, 2022: Texas

In Katy, Texas, a Catholic priest said someone tried to desecrate the Eucharist at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church. A local Fox Affiliate reported Father Peter Damian Harris, pastor of Holy Rosary Catholic Church in Houston, speaking of the May 9 incident.

May 8, 2022: California, Texas, Washington

Female protesters mass interrupted just before communion at Our Lady of the Angels Cathedral in Los Angeles, California. The women, dressed in red dresses and large white hats, began to shout and unfurl a banner before being escorted out of the church.

In Katy, Texas, another tabernacle was stolen overnight from St. Bartholomew the Apostle Catholic Church on May 8. Although an arrest has been made in connection with the theft, the tabernacle is still missing.

Still in Texas, the graffiti reading “Pro-choice is pro-life” was spray painted on the front and side doors of Holy Rosary Catholic Church in Houston.

In Washington State, Post Millennial reporter Kate Daviscourt capture on video protesters lying on the steps of St. James Cathedral in Seattle with fake blood on them to mimic coat hanger abortions during mass. involved a heated confrontation between a security guard and protesters, also captured in a video uploaded by The Post Millennial.

May 7, 2022: Colorado, New York

St. John XXIII Parish in Fort Collins, Colorado was tagged with graffiti May 7, according to police. Messages including “My body my choice” and a symbol that appears to be an “A” meaning “anarchy” were written on the church. Some of the church’s exterior glass panels were also shattered.

At New York, pro-abortion protesters gathered outside The old Saint Patrick’s Cathedral in Lower Manhattan. The protest disrupted a monthly pro-life procession from the church to the local Planned Parenthood. Among other things, a Franciscan friar was heckled and a woman in a padded bathing suit danced outside the church pretending to abort dolls.

The church’s pastor, Father Brian Graebe, later told Fox News“We received a number of threats to bomb the church, to set it on fire.”

May 3, 2022: Colorado

Sacred Heart of Mary Catholic Church, in Boulder, Colorado, was defaced with pro-abortion slogansincluding “My body, my choice”, marking the second time in less than a year that the parish has been the target of such graffiti.


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Patriarch of the Minassian Armenian Catholic Church in Fresno, California https://parishchurch.org.uk/patriarch-of-the-minassian-armenian-catholic-church-in-fresno-california/ Tue, 31 May 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/patriarch-of-the-minassian-armenian-catholic-church-in-fresno-california/ The head of the Armenian Catholic Church, His Beatitude Patriarch Raphael Bedros XXI Minassian, visited Fresno on Monday. The visit ended with an evening prayer service he led at St. John’s Cathedral in downtown Fresno, followed by a reception, before he left for Northern California. The Vespers service included chanting in Armenian and Minassian’s thanks […]]]>

The head of the Armenian Catholic Church, His Beatitude Patriarch Raphael Bedros XXI Minassian, visited Fresno on Monday.

The visit ended with an evening prayer service he led at St. John’s Cathedral in downtown Fresno, followed by a reception, before he left for Northern California. The Vespers service included chanting in Armenian and Minassian’s thanks for the Fresno welcome he received.

“Our hearts rang with joy,” said Bishop Joseph Brennan of Diocese of Fresno sharing his thanks.

Minassian serves under Pope Francis, spiritual leader of the Catholic Church. Born in Lebanon, Minassian was the Bishop of Armenian Catholics in Eastern Europe before his election as patriarch of the Armenian Catholic Church last year and served as parish priest in the United States for 15 years. He was also picked earlier this month represent catholics at the Middle East Council of Churches.

FRS_fresnoarmenianservice00
His Beatitude Raphael Bedros XXI Minassian, Catholicos-Patriarch of Cilicia of Armenian Catholics, right, leads a prayer service at St. John’s Cathedral in Fresno Monday, May 30, 2022. CRAIG KOHLRUSS ckohlruss@fresnobee.com

His visit to the Central San Joaquin Valley was a “unique opportunity” for community member Bryan Tellalian.

“We are kind of in a diaspora situation, and so even among Armenians, Armenian Catholics are a small group, so it means a lot to us that our patriarch thought of us to come here to Fresno,” Tellalian said. . “We are very grateful and feel very blessed.”

There are approximately 800,000 Armenian Catholics worldwide, the Diocese of Fresno said.

Tellalian shared his thanks at the end of the prayer service as a representative of the Fresno Armenian community. Many are descendants of Armenian Genocide survivors. Minassian visited the Armenian Genocide Monument in Fresno State earlier today.

By helping to announce his visit, the Fresno Armenian Museum stressed that there is a need for more charity in Armenia, Lebanon and the Middle East as thousands suffer the effects of war and an economic crisis and those interested in helping can donate to Armenian Catholic Eparchy.

Some Valley clergy of the Armenian Apostolic Church joined Monday’s prayer service. The Armenian Catholic Church is different from the Armenian Apostolic Church, another ancient religious sect, but Minassian told the Catholic News Agency that they share many similarities: “They have the same creed. They have the same liturgy. They have the same prayer.

Also Monday, First Armenian Presbyterian Church in Fresno hosted a Memorial Day picnic to celebrate its 125th birthday. First Armenian described itself as the oldest Armenian church in California.

Fresno Bee Related Stories

Carmen Kohlruss is a columnist and reporter for The Fresno Bee. His stories have won Best of the West, George F. Gruner, and McClatchy President’s awards, as well as numerous prestigious awards from the California News Publishers Association. She has a passion for sharing people’s stories to highlight issues and promote greater understanding.
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