Catholic church – Parish Church http://parishchurch.org.uk/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 04:22:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://parishchurch.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-37-120x120.png Catholic church – Parish Church http://parishchurch.org.uk/ 32 32 Vermont Catholic Church calls for demolition of old cathedral | Religion https://parishchurch.org.uk/vermont-catholic-church-calls-for-demolition-of-old-cathedral-religion/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/vermont-catholic-church-calls-for-demolition-of-old-cathedral-religion/ BURLINGTON, Vermont – The Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington is seeking permission to demolish a closed cathedral and grove of trees in downtown Vermont’s largest city. If the city grants permission to demolish the Immaculate Conception Church on Pine Street, an existing parking area would remain and the site would be left as an open […]]]>

BURLINGTON, Vermont – The Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington is seeking permission to demolish a closed cathedral and grove of trees in downtown Vermont’s largest city.

If the city grants permission to demolish the Immaculate Conception Church on Pine Street, an existing parking area would remain and the site would be left as an open lawn.

Burlington Zoning Division Director Scott Gustin said the church last week applied for a permit to demolish the church, built in the 1970s after the original building was destroyed by arson. It will take several months before a decision is made on whether or not to grant the permit.

Three years ago, the diocese said declining staff and finances forced the cathedral to close in the heart of downtown Burlington.

The Burlington Free Press reports that in an October letter to the city, Bishop Peter Routhier described the plans for the site.

“The church building and the property on which it stands are withdrawn from liturgical use and therefore, in accordance with canon law, the parish will desecrate the property – moving it from a sacred space to a secular space”, Routhier’s letter said. . “The desecration of the site will serve to help ward members cope with the loss of this parish, clean up the site and prevent any future non-sacred use of the building.”

This building was put on the market for 8.5 million dollars.


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Archbishop Tutu had close ties to the Catholic Church https://parishchurch.org.uk/archbishop-tutu-had-close-ties-to-the-catholic-church/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 18:48:56 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/archbishop-tutu-had-close-ties-to-the-catholic-church/ Anglican Archbishop Desmond Tutu addresses the Catholic Charities USA conference in Rochester, NY, October 3. the fight to end apartheid in his native South Africa, died at the age of 90 on December 26, 2021. (CNS Photo / Mike Mergen, Catholic Courier) Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who died on December 26, made his career as a […]]]>

Anglican Archbishop Desmond Tutu addresses the Catholic Charities USA conference in Rochester, NY, October 3. the fight to end apartheid in his native South Africa, died at the age of 90 on December 26, 2021. (CNS Photo / Mike Mergen, Catholic Courier)

Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who died on December 26, made his career as a cleric in the Anglican Church, but at one point he allegedly considered the Catholic priesthood. Instead, he got married in a Catholic church.

Born October 7, 1931, in Klerksdorp as one of four children of Zachariah, a teacher, and Aletta, a domestic worker, Desmond Mpilo Tutu’s first exposure to Christianity was held in the African Methodist Episcopal Church frequented by his parents. But he fell in love with Nomalizo Leah Shenxane, a Catholic. The two were married on July 2, 1955 in the Mary Queen of the Apostles Catholic Church in Johannesburg.

Father Oblate Jean Verot officiated. In the marriage register, kept in Latin, Father Verot notes that it is a “mixed marriage”, mentioning Leah as Catholic and Desmond as Protestant.

The two had four children together. The oldest, Trevor, was named after the Anglican Father (later Archbishop) Trevor Huddleston, who had a great influence on Tutu. The second was called Thandeka Theresa Ursula; the two middle names were a nod to Leah’s Catholic origins. The family worshiped in St. Paul’s Anglican Church, where Desmond played several lay roles.

There he found his calling and studied at St. Peter’s Theology College in Johannesburg before being ordained an Anglican priest in 1960. His final report from the university praised his exceptional skills and intelligence, but also noted that he “seemed to be in pain. ‘a touch of’ Roman Fever. “The report recommended that” maybe his bishop would do well to ask him about it before ordination. “

The apparent affliction of “Roman fever” hinted that Tutu was showing signs of adherence to the beliefs and practices of the Catholic Church, as noted by South African biographer John Allen in his 2006 biography of the Archbishop, “Rabble-Rouser for Peace”.

This flirtation with Catholic practices continued even after Archbishop Tutu was appointed bishop. When he was appointed general secretary of the South African Council of Churches in 1978, he introduced staff prayer meetings, retreats and the like. Her daily prayer routine remained one of disciplined devotion, including the Eucharist in the morning and the Angelus at noon, with Ave Maria.

Bishop Tutu had great devotion to Saint Thérèse of Lisieux, whose spirituality was rooted in prayer.

“Since I’m not part of the Catholic tradition, I think my interest in it indicates that it has ecumenical appeal,” he once said. “She encourages us to understand the importance of turning in on oneself for inner peace, of seeking solitude, silence and expectation, of being with God. It must not have been easy to achieve such an important position in the church at a time when women were often seen rather than heard, ”he said in the 2018 book,“ Beautiful Thoughts for fine spirits ”by John Scally.

Archbishop Tutu’s social and political commitments were based on what he saw as the gospel mandate. In this, he followed the path set by older Christian leaders, including Catholic Archbishop Denis Hurley of Durban, who in 1958 pushed the Catholic Church to be the first church body to declare the racist system of apartheid a “structural sin”. Archbishop Tutu would later say that Archbishop Hurley, a tall man, was the giant “on whose shoulders we stood.”

Archbishop Tutu visited the Pretoria courthouse where Archbishop Hurley was indicted in 1985 for exposing atrocities committed by the apartheid regime in what is now Namibia. From the wharf, Archbishop Hurley did not address the tribunal, but during breaks he spoke with supporters, jokingly inviting Archbishop Tutu and Leah to join him on the wharf. The charges against Archbishop Hurley were dropped even before the trial began.

After becoming Archbishop of Cape Town in 1985, Archbishop Tutu – along with Catholic Archbishop Stephen Naidoo and Reverend Allan Boesak – formed a trinity of church negotiators to defuse crises in Cape Town. After police gunfire in Cape Town killed more than 20 people on election night in September 1989, Archbishop Tutu prayed intensely and unilaterally decided to call a protest march which began at St. George.

In place, newly elected President Frederick W. de Klerk authorized the march to proceed. Some 35,000 “Rainbow People”, as Archbishop Tutu called them that day, attended. According to De Klerk, this march pushed apartheid over the cliff.

By then, Tutu had already received the Nobel Peace Prize, in 1984. In 1987, he received a prestigious Catholic honor: the Pacem in Terris Prize, named after the historic encyclical of Saint John XXIII on the peace on earth.

– – –

Simmermacher is editor-in-chief of The Southern Cross, Cape Town.

Category: News from the United States and the world


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Byrnes: Inclusiveness is key for the Catholic Church | News https://parishchurch.org.uk/byrnes-inclusiveness-is-key-for-the-catholic-church-news/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 03:59:00 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/byrnes-inclusiveness-is-key-for-the-catholic-church-news/ Archbishop Michael J. Byrnes has released his Christmas message for 2021. My dear brothers and sisters, The peace and joy of Jesus Christ be with you this Christmas Day! As we celebrate Christmas and the Happy Birth of… Jesus, I extend my prayers to all of Guam. Something as magnificent as the Son of God […]]]>

Archbishop Michael J. Byrnes has released his Christmas message for 2021.

My dear brothers and sisters,

The peace and joy of Jesus Christ be with you this Christmas Day!

As we celebrate Christmas and the Happy Birth of… Jesus, I extend my prayers to all of Guam. Something as magnificent as the Son of God made flesh to save us from our sins should awaken our hearts to prayer, fervently and frequently. We pray in exaltation. We pray in thanks. We pray as a way to converse with our Lord and tell him how much we love him for all that he has done and continues to do for us.

The birth of our Savior, the coming of our Redeemer, is the source of our happiness as baptized infants of God. This is why, as Christians, we can experience excruciating trials, losses, and sorrows while still emerging firmly in our faith. Without his saving grace, we are ruined. Without his guiding Light, we are lost.

This Christmas season, I encourage everyone to resolve to follow the light of Jesus Christ more closely. Just as the Magi were guided by the Star of Bethlehem in their search for the holy child king born of Mary, trust the light of the world to guide you in every effort and decision you make. May you grow in holiness with every step you take.

Complete trust in God and surrender to the will of the Holy Spirit is precisely what our Archdiocese of Agaña and the Church around the world must do in the coming months. Pope Francis called on the Church to embark on a path of communion, participation and mission within the framework of a Synod on Synodality which will bring together the bishops in Rome in 2023.

The Church of Guam began our diocesan phase of the synod with Mass on December 7 at Dulce Nombre de Maria Basilica-Cathedral. On the eve of the feast of Santa Marian Kamalen and the solemnity of the Immaculate Conception, we have certainly found more reasons to come together in prayer. Please include serious petitions in your daily prayers that our Archdiocese will recognize and follow the guidance of the Holy Spirit during the diocesan phase.

In this Synod, we will walk together with the goal of being more inclusive as we look to our future Church, paying special attention to those on the margins, whose concerns and perspective are so often overlooked. In a very real sense, the process will not be a time of Church preaching, rather it will be a time of reflection and listening.

The Church will host listening sessions across the island that will welcome the hearts and voices of a wide range of people. We will strive to create a space to hear the Holy Spirit together and get a sense of the direction the Church should take at this time in history. Synodality seeks to include not only those who attend Mass and are active in our parishes but the silent majority as well as those who have left the Church, feel excluded or feel pushed to the periphery of the Church and the Church. company.

In our local effort it is important that we strengthen our friendship with Jesus because he is the one who will walk with us as we walk this Synod of Synodality. It is the gift that we celebrate at Christmas and every day of our lives, that God gave his only son to be with us, to guide us and save us from our sins.

Merry Christmas to you and your loved ones.


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Vermont Catholic Church wants to demolish old cathedral https://parishchurch.org.uk/vermont-catholic-church-wants-to-demolish-old-cathedral-2/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/vermont-catholic-church-wants-to-demolish-old-cathedral-2/ BURLINGTON, Vermont (AP) – The Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington is seeking permission to demolish a closed cathedral and grove of trees in downtown Vermont’s largest city. If the city grants permission to demolish the Immaculate Conception Church on Pine Street, an existing parking area would remain and the site would be left as an […]]]>

BURLINGTON, Vermont (AP) – The Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington is seeking permission to demolish a closed cathedral and grove of trees in downtown Vermont’s largest city.

If the city grants permission to demolish the Immaculate Conception Church on Pine Street, an existing parking area would remain and the site would be left as an open lawn.

Burlington Zoning Division Director Scott Gustin said the church last week applied for a permit to demolish the church, built in the 1970s after the original building was destroyed by arson. It will take several months before a decision is made on whether or not to grant the permit.

Three years ago, the diocese said declining staff and finances forced the cathedral to close in the heart of downtown Burlington.

Burlington Free Press reports that in an October letter to the city, Monsignor Peter Routhier exposed the plans for the site.

“The church building and the property on which it stands are withdrawn from liturgical use and therefore, in accordance with canon law, the parish will desecrate the property – moving it from a sacred space to a secular space”, Routhier’s letter said. . “The desecration of the site will serve to help ward members cope with the loss of this parish, clean up the site and prevent any future non-sacred use of the building.”

This building was put on the market for 8.5 million dollars.


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The surprising link between a neighborhood in Raleigh and the Catholic Church :: WRAL.com https://parishchurch.org.uk/the-surprising-link-between-a-neighborhood-in-raleigh-and-the-catholic-church-wral-com/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 23:10:23 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/the-surprising-link-between-a-neighborhood-in-raleigh-and-the-catholic-church-wral-com/ This article was written for our sponsor, the Catholic Diocese of Raleigh. Just west of downtown Raleigh is a neighborhood like many in the area, populated by shopping malls, gas stations and apartment complexes. It forms a bit of a peninsula on the North Carolina State University campus, surrounded by undergraduate housing and student hangouts. […]]]>

This article was written for our sponsor, the Catholic Diocese of Raleigh.

Just west of downtown Raleigh is a neighborhood like many in the area, populated by shopping malls, gas stations and apartment complexes. It forms a bit of a peninsula on the North Carolina State University campus, surrounded by undergraduate housing and student hangouts.

So it may be surprising to learn of its history as a 600-acre area named Nazareth, a place that still has significance for the Catholic Church in North Carolina.

In the beginning, the Mission Valley neighborhood was an African-American community, where many families lived until the 1980s, said Bishop Jerry Lewis, historian for the Catholic Diocese of Raleigh. North Carolina’s first Catholic priest, Father Thomas Frederick Price, bought property there in the 1890s and worked with residents to rename the area to Nazareth.

Price was “incredibly energetic and idealistic,” said Bill Powers, author of “Tar Heel Catholics: A History of Catholicism in North Carolina”. He intended to create both an orphanage and a seminary.

While the seminar did not function, the orphanage was successful and accommodated up to 350 children at a time, over its existence of about a century.

The land Price acquired was a farm, and it continued to function as a cattle farm and gardens for the benefit of the neighborhood and the children who lived in the orphanage.

“It was a productive area as well as a very scenic area,” Lewis said.

The Catholic Church has benefited the neighborhood and its surroundings in a variety of ways, including providing work opportunities, Lewis said.

“The church employed a number of families in laundry, cooking, cooking, bus driving, that sort of thing when the orphanage was going on,” Lewis said. “The Belmont Mercy Sisters looked after the children, and there was a priest overseeing.”

Price, who was eager to share the message of Catholicism with everyone, worked for 20 years in North Carolina, then turned to the Department of Foreign Affairs. In 1911, he and another priest founded what would become the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers, an organization “dedicated to missionary work abroad in over 20 countries,” according to its website. To supervise the work, Price moved to China, where he eventually died.

Now Price is considered for holiness, a long process that began in 2012.

“We are in the very first step of the process,” Lewis said. “We asked the Congregation (for the Causes of Saints) in Rome to start the process, and they approved this part, and our commission here has done a full study of all of Father Price’s writings and verified and certified that. and sent everything to Rome. “

The neighborhood that Price envisioned and helped build has changed a lot over the years. A bishop leased part of the land to a commercial area. An additional 75 acres became part of the North Carolina State University campus. But it’s still a special place, sacred ground even, Powers said.

The dream of building a cathedral there was realized in 2017, and it shines “like a beacon of light on Raleigh,” Powers said. It is a symbol of the strength the church has become in North Carolina, with two dioceses in the state and hundreds of thousands of believers.

In all the ministries and community works in which the diocese is involved, it remains dedicated to its mission to help those in need by alleviating the effects of poverty while fostering hope by developing transformational solutions.

This article was written for our sponsor, the Catholic Diocese of Raleigh.


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Singapore Catholic Church concludes bicentennial celebrations https://parishchurch.org.uk/singapore-catholic-church-concludes-bicentennial-celebrations/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 16:37:21 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/singapore-catholic-church-concludes-bicentennial-celebrations/ The bicentennial celebrations, which began on December 13, 2020, ended on Saturday with simultaneous masses at all 32 parish churches in Singapore. By Robin Gomes Singapore’s Catholic Church closed its 200-year celebration in the city-state last week. The bells of the island’s 32 Catholic parish churches rang simultaneously for one minute at 6 p.m. on […]]]>

The bicentennial celebrations, which began on December 13, 2020, ended on Saturday with simultaneous masses at all 32 parish churches in Singapore.

By Robin Gomes

Singapore’s Catholic Church closed its 200-year celebration in the city-state last week. The bells of the island’s 32 Catholic parish churches rang simultaneously for one minute at 6 p.m. on Saturday, followed by masses.

All the churches were inspired by the main mass celebrated by Archbishop William Goh of Singapore in the Cathedral of the Good Shepherd, the oldest Catholic church in the country.

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong shared the joy of the Catholic community in Singapore with his presence at Mass in the cathedral in recognition of the presence of the Church and its contribution to Singapore.

Other people present at the Mass on December 11 included the Apostolic Nuncio, Archbishop Marek Zalewski, the wife of the Prime Minister, Ho Ching, the Minister of Culture, Community and Youth Edwin Tong, the Minister of Culture and Chairman of the Singapore Interfaith Organization.

“Light up and shine in faith” was the theme of the one-year bicentennial celebrations, dubbed Catholic200SG, under the Archdiocese of Singapore, the island’s only diocese. The final week, December 4-11, saw a flurry of events and programs leading up to Saturday masses.





Archbishop William Goh at the start of mass.

The beginning

The French Saint Laurent Imbert, member of the Society of Foreign Missions of Paris (MEP), is considered the Catholic priest to have celebrated the first mass in the island nation, after having landed on the shores of Singapore on December 11, 1821 .

He wrote to Bishop Esprit Marie Joseph Florens, the apostolic vicar of Siam who had appointed him: “I arrived in Singapore on the 11th instant, and I visited, at the request of Your Lordship, the Catholics of this new colony. There are only 12 or 13 in number and seem to lead miserable lives. ”

From there he traveled to Korea, where he was appointed apostolic vicar in 1836. He was martyred there on September 21, 1839 at the age of 43. He is one of the 301 martyrs of Korea who were declared saints by Pope John Paul in 1984.

A participatory church

Today, Singapore’s Catholics number 300,000 and have made their presence and contributions felt in the city-state.

“We are called to give thanks for what the Lord is doing through our Church”, declared Bishop Goh in his homily. “Despite a downward trend in many countries where people are losing faith in God, the recent census shows that we have grown stronger over the past five years,” he told worshipers, who were few in number. taking into account the Covid-. 19 protocols.

The closing mass of the Singapore centenary celebrations.




The closing mass of the Singapore centenary celebrations.

Archbishop Goh expressed his satisfaction that the Catholic200SG celebrations brought Catholics together in a creative way. Online events and videos garnered over one million views during the anniversary year. The festival from December 4 to 11 saw 12,000 Catholics attend various events and activities in the Archdiocese, and over 6,000 others attended the final closing Masses in churches in the 32 parishes.

State and religion

Prime Minister Lee expressed his satisfaction at being able to join the Catholic community at Singapore Cathedral. In a Facebook post, he said he learned from a video about the contribution of the Catholic Church in Singapore for two centuries, through education, health care and social protection. “In our multireligious society, Catholics prosper and coexist in harmony with other religions,” he added.

In terms of the ethnic makeup of Singapore’s 3.52 million people, it is made up of 74.3% Chinese, 13.5% Malays, 9% Indians and the remaining 3.2%, according to the census. from 2020.

Among residents aged 15 and over, 31.1% identified as Buddhists, 8.8% as Taoists, 18.9% as Christians, 15.6% as Muslims, and 5.0% as Hindus. People without religious affiliation represented 20.0%.

The majority of Buddhist Chinese, Malaysian Muslims and Indian Hindus in Singapore have largely avoided conflict since race riots between Chinese and Malays killed around 40 people in the 1960s.

Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong (2nd from right) speaks with Archbishop Goh




Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong (2nd from right) speaks with Archbishop Goh

Archbishop Goh stressed that although the government is secular, it maintains neutrality and encourages cooperation between religions in the development of social, moral and spiritual values ​​of the people.

“The religions here in Singapore are respectful and support each other,” he said, adding, “We have a very strong interfaith harmony in Singapore, something that has been painstakingly built over many generations. “

A dynamic church

The Archbishop noted that the Church has grown “internally” over the past eight years, in terms of Archdiocesan offices, strengthening and new movements. Some new have been added and others expanded, such as the Engaging Youth Office, especially those in colleges, universities and working adults. The Family Commission with 11 affiliates has been re-established and now serves the engaged, married, divorced and bereaved.

With the start of the new Council of Directors of Catholic Schools, the Archdiocesan Commission for Catholic Schools (ACCS) has been very active. The archdiocese has also strengthened its digital media, Catholic Radio and Catholic News. New movements have sprung up, such as the Catholic Leadership Center, the Catholic Architectural Guild, the Catholic Social Workers Guild and others. “Indeed, our Church is alive! Our Catholic lay people are alive! Our organizations are alive. They are filled with the Holy Spirit, ”Archbishop Goh said.

Singapore Catholic Church


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Portuguese Catholic Church to set up committee to investigate child sexual abuse https://parishchurch.org.uk/portuguese-catholic-church-to-set-up-committee-to-investigate-child-sexual-abuse/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/portuguese-catholic-church-to-set-up-committee-to-investigate-child-sexual-abuse/ The Catholic Church in Portugal has announced that it will set up a national committee to investigate the sexual abuse of children and vulnerable adults. The new authority will coordinate the work of local religious groups looking into possible cases of historical abuse by members of the clergy. Portuguese bishops said on Thursday the committee […]]]>

The Catholic Church in Portugal has announced that it will set up a national committee to investigate the sexual abuse of children and vulnerable adults.

The new authority will coordinate the work of local religious groups looking into possible cases of historical abuse by members of the clergy.

Portuguese bishops said on Thursday the committee would “strengthen and broaden” the church’s response to any allegations of abuse.

The plans of the national committee were announced after a four-day meeting at the Sanctuary of Fátima in central Portugal.

“We are not afraid” of this question, declared Mgr José Ornelas, president of the Portuguese Episcopal Conference (CEP).

It comes after an explosive report last month uncovered widespread child sexual abuse within the French Catholic Church.

An independent commission has estimated that some 330,000 children have been sexually abused for more than 70 years by French priests or other figures linked to the Church.

Two years ago, Portuguese church officials said authorities had investigated only a dozen allegations of sexual abuse involving Portuguese priests since 2001.

More than half of those cases were dropped because church investigators decided there was not enough evidence to prosecute them.

More than 200 prominent Catholics sent a letter to the Episcopal Conference earlier this month urging them to launch a similar investigation in France.

Church officials did not specify who would sit on the national committee to serve as a “listening post” for the progress of the investigations.

The 21 local groups across the country that assess cases of child sexual abuse are made up largely of lay people, including lawyers, psychologists and psychiatrists.

The groups were created following Pope Francis’ call in 2019 for the church to address allegations of abuse.


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Four new deacons for the Catholic Church in Kota Kinabalu https://parishchurch.org.uk/four-new-deacons-for-the-catholic-church-in-kota-kinabalu/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 21:19:29 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/four-new-deacons-for-the-catholic-church-in-kota-kinabalu/ One geologist, the other engineer, the other road works supervisor and the fourth supermarket supervisor – these four people from different backgrounds are now deacons in the Catholic Church. Dec 11, 2019 2021 Newly ordained deacons (left to right) Peter, Lasius, Terans and Sylvester attending the Eucharistic celebration during their diaconal ordination on December 4 […]]]>

One geologist, the other engineer, the other road works supervisor and the fourth supermarket supervisor – these four people from different backgrounds are now deacons in the Catholic Church.

Dec 11, 2019 2021

Newly ordained deacons (left to right) Peter, Lasius, Terans and Sylvester attending the Eucharistic celebration during their diaconal ordination on December 4 at the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart

By Linda Edward
Four people from different backgrounds – geologist, engineer, construction supervisor, and supermarket supervisor – are now deacons in the Catholic Church.

Lasius Gantis, 30, from Inobong parish, Peter Chung Pit Soon, 43, from Tuaran parish, Terans Thadeus, 33, from Limbahau parish and Sylvester Wong Vun Cheong, 42, from the cathedral of the Sacred Heart, stood before Archbishop John Wong of Kota Kinabalu, who ordained them deacons of the Church, on December 4, during the 10:00 am ordination mass at the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart.

Deacons will assist the Archbishop and priests, among other tasks, by providing spiritual guidance to the community, visiting the sick and the elderly, attending weddings, baptisms, distributing Holy Communion and presiding over services. funeral.

Deacon Terans spoke on behalf of the four newly ordained to be ordained to the order of deacons in times of pandemic: “Being a deacon is a new beginning for us. The real service of our calling has just begun.

“The pandemic world has indeed brought uncertainties in our lives and perhaps despair to some of us.

“May today’s ordination give us a glimmer of hope that God will never leave us because God is love.

“If not for God’s sake, the Archdiocese of Kota Kinabalu would not have four new deacons today,” said the newly ordained.

Archbishop John Wong also expressed the same feeling that God is the one who blesses the Church through this ordination.

“I thank God for his continued love and care for our local Church. He never fails to bless us with young people who are ready to devote their lives to being his instruments of love and service ”, declared the prelate.

It is fortunate that there are now four additional ministers of the Word and the Sacraments to meet the needs of the people of the Archdiocese.

He congratulated and welcomed the new four: “I would like to congratulate the four for their availability to serve as deacons, for their courage and their generosity to come forward.

“I invite you to join with the rest of our priests in responding to the growing pastoral needs of our local Church,” said the Archbishop.

A joyous celebration like this would normally bring worshipers together by the thousands, if not hundreds, but by now the Church is already accustomed to the new standard of healthcare standard operating procedures that limit travel and drastically reduce numbers. of people in any one event.

The people present at the ordination mass were the families of the four new presidents of the parish pastoral councils of the parishes concerned, the nuns and the other guests. Nonetheless, many attended Mass virtually via the Cathedral’s Youtube channel.

The Archbishop recognized the faith, support and encouragement of the family members who initiated the diaconal ordination of their sons. He reassured them that God’s blessings are not limited only to newly ordained, but also to their entire families.

Deacon Terans entered the seminary as an aspirant in the formation house of the Archdiocese of Kota Kinabalu in 2010, continued to the Year of Initiation (IY) in 2011, to the Year of Philosophy in 2012-2013 and the theological year in 2014-2015. In 2016 he took leave in 2016 and worked at Gammerlite Sdn Bhd for three years until 2018. Then he returned to seminary and continued his theological year in 2019 until May 2021.

Meanwhile, Deacon Lasius entered the Archdiocesan formation house as an aspirant in 2013. Then, in 2014, he joined Deacons Sylvester and Peter during the Initiation Year (IY) and subsequent years. .

Deacons Sylvester and Peter entered seminary in 2014 for 7.5 years from the Year of Initiation (IY). In 2015-2016, all three continued with the year of philosophy and the last year of theology in 2017-May 2021.

Deacons graduated from St Peter’s College Seminary in Kuching at the beginning of May this year and began their pastoral attachment in parishes at the end of May.

As deacons, they will remain where they were assigned for their pastoral work; Deacon Peter will continue to serve in Labuan Parish, Deacon Lasius in Kiulu Parish, Deacon Sylvester in Inanam Parish and Deacon Terans in Tuaran Parish.–CS


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Festival closes bicentennial of Catholic Church in Singapore https://parishchurch.org.uk/festival-closes-bicentennial-of-catholic-church-in-singapore/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 15:47:45 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/festival-closes-bicentennial-of-catholic-church-in-singapore/ Singapore – Singapore Catholics mark the end of a year-long celebrations of the 200th anniversary of the church’s presence in the city-state with activities in a part of the city with historic Catholic roots. The bicentennial celebrations, known as the Catholic200SG Festival, began on December 4 and end with simultaneous masses at all 32 Catholic […]]]>

Singapore – Singapore Catholics mark the end of a year-long celebrations of the 200th anniversary of the church’s presence in the city-state with activities in a part of the city with historic Catholic roots.

The bicentennial celebrations, known as the Catholic200SG Festival, began on December 4 and end with simultaneous masses at all 32 Catholic churches in Singapore on December 11, the Archdiocese of Singapore said.

On the last day of the festival, Archbishop William Goh of Singapore will celebrate main mass in the Cathedral of the Good Shepherd, the oldest Catholic church in the country. The simultaneous ringing of church bells across the island for one minute will mark the close of the Jubilee Year.

UCA News reported that the church had organized nearly 100 activities in the area known as the Mission District, which is home to three churches and the Catholic Center. Activities are grouped into arts, community and spirituality, with the aim of showcasing what it is to be Catholic in Singapore.

“We wanted to bring the activities to this part of the city because this area is of great importance to us,” said Father Valerian Cheong, co-chair of the Catholic200SG steering committee.

The Mission District is the very heart of the nascent but growing Catholic community that took root when Singapore began to thrive on trade, he said. It was the region where various Chinese dialect groups, Indian and European speaking communities came to pray and help each other in difficult times. It is also the district where many Catholic schools were founded, he added.

The Singapore Church began the Jubilee Year on December 13, 2020, with a virtual Mass celebrated by Archbishop Goh. A special jubilee website and logo were launched and a documentary on the social impact of the Catholic Church in Singapore was shown.

The theme of the Jubilee Year, “Igniting and Shining with Faith,” focused on the pastoral vision of the Archdiocese of Singapore to shape a more dynamic, evangelizing and missionary church.

The events focused on the renewal of the faith of the Catholic community through four aspects: deepening, discerning, witnessing and celebrating.

Archbishop Goh said the bicentennial was an opportunity to galvanize Catholics for the past, present and future.

“We want to celebrate with gratitude and thanksgiving how far we have come. We must give our Catholics the means to be alive in their faith and to evangelize. And we should all be inspired to work for a future where humanity and creation find their fulfillment in God. Said the prelate.

Singapore was a Malaysian fishing village when it was founded by Sir Stamford Raffles, who made it a British colony in 1819. Soon after, Catholic missionaries arrived, and the Catholic Church is credited with vital contributions to nation building through education, health care and social welfare.

Saint Laurent Marie Joseph Imbert, French priest of the Society of Foreign Missions of Paris, landed in Singapore in 1821 for missionary missions in Malaysia and China.

He was martyred on September 21, 1839 in Korea for refusing to reveal the whereabouts of other foreign missionaries during a period of Christian persecution in the country. He was canonized by Saint John Paul II in Seoul in 1984.

The date of Saint Laurent’s arrival in Singapore is historically known as the start of the Catholic Church in Singapore.

Singapore is a multi-religious, multi-ethnic nation with an estimated population of 5.6 million. Most Chinese are Buddhists and most Malays are Muslims. Christians represent about 15% of the population.

The Archdiocese of Singapore has 360,000 Catholics.


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Interview: Bishop Wack discusses “anger, division” in the American Catholic Church https://parishchurch.org.uk/interview-bishop-wack-discusses-anger-division-in-the-american-catholic-church/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 09:06:03 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/interview-bishop-wack-discusses-anger-division-in-the-american-catholic-church/ Bishop William Wack of Pensacola-Tallahassee, Fla., Smiles on November 13, 2017, during the fall general assembly of the U.S. Catholic Bishops’ Conference in Baltimore. (SNC / Roll Bob) Christendom has come and gone, says Bishop William Wack of Pensacola-Tallahassee, Florida. “We have reached the end of Christianity,” said Wack, who told NCR in a recent […]]]>

Bishop William Wack of Pensacola-Tallahassee, Fla., Smiles on November 13, 2017, during the fall general assembly of the U.S. Catholic Bishops’ Conference in Baltimore. (SNC / Roll Bob)

Christendom has come and gone, says Bishop William Wack of Pensacola-Tallahassee, Florida.

“We have reached the end of Christianity,” said Wack, who told NCR in a recent interview that the church’s goal should not be to restore a supposed golden age of Christianity or to rebuild an political culture where the Christian faith reigns supreme.

“Our faith is not built on this sponsored or state-sponsored Christianity. It is built on one person: Jesus Christ, who is the same yesterday, today and tomorrow,” Wack said, explaining in the interview his vision of the Christian faith. and the modern society of which he spoke in his first pastoral letter.

Released on November 4, Wack’s 18-page letter, titled “Sharing the Gift,” focuses on evangelism. Echoing Pope Francis, Wack urges Catholics in his North Florida diocese to become “missionary disciples” by living their faith and seizing opportunities to share it with their neighbors.

In “Sharing the gift”, Wack, a priest of the Holy Cross who became bishop of Pensacola-Tallahassee in August 2017, quotes Gaudium et Spes and Lumen gentium of the Vatican Council II.

Wack also recognizes “the great amount of anger, division, anxiety and hopelessness” in modern times. Under such circumstances, Wack says the temptation is to retreat and “circle the wagons” to defend the Christian faith from outside forces, or to use the gospel only to solve burning social problems. Such approaches, says Wack, miss the essence of the Christian faith.

Wack discussed his pastoral letter in an interview in early November, before the assembly of American bishops in Baltimore, where the bishops approved a document on “Eucharistic consistency” after months of controversy over the efforts of some prelates to s’ address pro-choice Catholic politicians like President Joe Biden.

Here’s NCR’s interview with Wack, slightly edited for length and context.

RCN: Four years after becoming a bishop, what made it the right time to take up a pen and write your first pastoral letter?

Wack: When I got there, everything was new. I came straight from a parish to become bishop of a diocese. And we had a lot of problems; we had hurricanes, we had personnel issues, we had a fire in the co-cathedral, and then the pandemic. I spent most of the first three and a half years reacting in some way to things that are going on in the world and in this diocese.

Finally, six months ago, I thought, “This is it now. It is time to teach and express my hope, my plan, my heart for the diocese. There would never be a perfect moment when everything is slow and calm. It was right.

Plus, it’s not just my plan; it comes from my interactions with the people, the parishioners, the priests here. The spirit is pushing us, I think, to do something very positive. We argue about everything. There is so much acrimony and division. We have to get out. We must again evangelize.

Pope Francis greets Bishop William Wack of Pensacola-Tallahassee, Florida during a meeting with American bishops from Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina at the Vatican on February 13, 2020 (CNS) / Vatican Media)

Pope Francis greets Bishop William Wack of Pensacola-Tallahassee, Florida during a meeting with American bishops from Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina at the Vatican on February 13, 2020 (CNS) / Vatican Media)

What prompted you to focus on evangelism?

We are in a very fractured, very fearful world. There is confusion, there is anger, there is anxiety. And this is nothing new. It has been around since the time of Jesus, and before Jesus. But in the midst of it, we are called to live our faith. We are changed people because of Jesus Christ. Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI said that we have this relationship with Jesus, and it changes the whole direction of our life. But if you look around it doesn’t seem like we are believing or experiencing this. We are caught up in so much that is going on.

In the letter, why did you write that Christendom is “dead”?

I meant it was provocative, so people could research it, talk about it, and wonder what it means. It really means that we are back in apostolic times. We just got to go out and preach the good news, in a very simple way. I’m not saying you should go out around the corner with a Bible and Sunday school. If you do, great, but share your faith. Pray in public. Give people hope. Comfort the people. Direct them to something greater than anything we are discussing today.

Do you see the mission of the church today as trying to restore Christendom somehow, as some would say, or something else?

I don’t think that’s our goal. In writing this provocative statement, I want to help people see, make sense of what’s going on in the world, and give us positive direction. We can no longer take for granted that Christian values ​​are the norm, and that’s okay. We’re not going to go back and fix that and figure out how we can have this empire again or whatever. This is what God calls us to do now.

“We are in a very fractured world, very fearful. There is confusion, there is anger, there is anxiety. And this is nothing new.”

Bishop William Wack

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As you noted in your letter, the gospel was quite new in apostolic times. Two thousand years later, there is a feeling that Christianity has been tried and found insufficient. How to evangelize in a relevant way in the 21st century?

That’s why I think we have to embody [the Catholic faith]. Even with this letter, it is important to note that I am not saying to people, “Distribute this to your friends, and you evangelize. This is really written for those who are already in the pews to give them the tools or challenge them to embody the faith in a very simple way. We can all live in a way that people will say to us, “I don’t know what it is about you, but I want it.

Citing from Lumen gentium and Gaudium et Spes, is it fair to say that your vision of evangelism is rooted in Vatican II?

I really wanted to give people that impression. Vatican II recognizes the need for us to come out of ourselves. Before that, naturally and naturally, we took care of our own. But I think that with Vatican II we realized that we have to share this gift with the whole world. We are the leaven of the world. Pope Francis picked up on that and is all about missionary discipleship. It’s not just something that I invented or that Pope Francis did. It is clearly part of our history.

What do you think of the divisions and acrimony in the church, especially those we see playing out among bishops and among Catholics on social media?

Unfortunately, it has always been there. We have the famous story of Peter and Paul in disagreement on [evangelizing] Gentile Christians, and how Paul said he would go straight to Peter and look him in the eye to tell him he was wrong. I think it’s good for people to know that this is nothing new. Unfortunately, what is new is that it is amplified on social media.

Bishop William Wack of Pensacola-Tallahassee, Florida, center, and other American bishops from Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina wait to meet Pope Francis at the Vatican Apostolic Palace on the 13th. February 2020 (CNS / Paul Haring)

Bishop William Wack of Pensacola-Tallahassee, Florida, center, and other American bishops from Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina wait to meet Pope Francis at the Vatican Apostolic Palace on the 13th. February 2020 (CNS / Paul Haring)

What do you think of how some debates have become political within the church?

I move away from it. In the Bible, Jesus was asked about paying taxes. I loved his response. He didn’t say yes or no. He said to give Caesar what is Caesar’s, but the most important thing is to give God what is God’s. I guess that’s what I’m really trying to focus on, this second part. We are so caught up in these burning issues of our time, which are important and need to be addressed, but I fear we are neglecting Part Two.

With this in mind, would Jesus tell us not to let ourselves be drawn into cultural wars?

I do not know. It would have been interesting to know what he would have said about all these things. But we do know that when asked about some issues of his day, like paying taxes, he sort of dismissed them. We all have different lenses through which we read the scriptures, but for me I see Jesus turning his face towards Jerusalem and people trying to distract him and trip him up. His response has always been, “You don’t understand, people. God is love, and he wants you to accept it and he wants you to pass it on to other people. That’s why I have come.” Some would say that is too simplistic, and I understand that. But that’s who I am.

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