Grant to repair the historic window of Shrewsbury Cathedral

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Shrewsbury Cathedral received funding from the Cultural Recovery Fund to repair and restore its spectacular east window

Shrewsbury Roman Catholic Cathedral at Belmont in Shrewsbury is repairing and restoring the giant eastern window that overlooks the congregation.

The work received funding from the Government Culture Recovery Fund – administered by Historic England.

The window was installed in time for the opening of the cathedral in 1856 and was created by the famous stained glass company Hardman & Co.

The spectacular window is the first thing visitors see when they enter the cathedral, providing an awe-inspiring backdrop to its sanctuary.

Canon Christopher Matthews, dean of the cathedral, welcomed the funding and said he will ensure the window will be there for years to come.

He said: “We are delighted to have received this grant allowing us to restore such a beautiful and important window in our cathedral, protecting it for future generations to enjoy.”

Shrewsbury Cathedral received funding from the Cultural Recovery Fund to repair and restore its spectacular east window
Shrewsbury Cathedral received funding from the Cultural Recovery Fund to repair and restore its spectacular east window
Shrewsbury Cathedral received funding from the Cultural Recovery Fund to repair and restore its spectacular east window
Shrewsbury Cathedral received funding from the Cultural Recovery Fund to repair and restore its spectacular east window

The cathedral has been the subject of a series of restoration efforts in recent years, with work uncovering historic murals and impressive Gothic floor tiles buried under a suspended wooden floor – created by the famous architect Edward Welby Pugin.

A wrought iron cross has also been restored, repainted and replaced on the roof of the cathedral, while the bell has also been restored, repaired and cleaned, and is now able to ring again after almost 50 years of silence.

Confirming the funding, Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries said: “From local churches to ancient buildings and landscapes, the UK’s unique heritage makes our towns and villages stronger, more vibrant and helps bring communities together.

“This latest funding – £ 35million from our unprecedented Culture Recovery Fund – will help protect sites like Jane Austen’s Home and Hampton Court Palace for future generations and help them better. rebuild after the pandemic. “


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