st mary – Parish Church http://parishchurch.org.uk/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 00:00:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://parishchurch.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-37-120x120.png st mary – Parish Church http://parishchurch.org.uk/ 32 32 St. Agnes Catholic Church Continues Reflections on Lent Wednesday | Entertainment/Life https://parishchurch.org.uk/st-agnes-catholic-church-continues-reflections-on-lent-wednesday-entertainment-life/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/st-agnes-catholic-church-continues-reflections-on-lent-wednesday-entertainment-life/ St. Agnes Catholic Church, 749 East Blvd., Baton Rouge, will host Adoremus! The Eucharist: source and summit of our Christian life Lenten reflection at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Dr. Geoffrey Bain, independent researcher in philosophy, literature and history, will present the reflection. Confessions are at 5:00 p.m., Mass at 5:30 p.m., the Rosary of Divine Mercy […]]]>

St. Agnes Catholic Church, 749 East Blvd., Baton Rouge, will host Adoremus! The Eucharist: source and summit of our Christian life Lenten reflection at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Dr. Geoffrey Bain, independent researcher in philosophy, literature and history, will present the reflection.

Confessions are at 5:00 p.m., Mass at 5:30 p.m., the Rosary of Divine Mercy at 6:00 p.m., immediately followed by Lenten reflection.

To visit www.stagnesbr.org for more information.

Organist performance

Renowned organist Jacob Benda will perform on the 50-row, three-manual Reuter pipe organ in St. Joseph’s Cathedral “Providence” at 7 p.m. on Tuesday.

Benda, a native and resident of St. Cloud, Minnesota, whose Baton Rouge appearance has been postponed twice in the past two years — first due to the initial COVID-19 pandemic lockdown, then A Hand Wound – will perform a program of classical, sacred and improvised organ works by composers Charles Tournemire, Maurice Durufle, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Francis Poulenc, Charles Marie Widor and Cesar Franck.

Highlights of the program will include the premiere in the Southeastern United States of “The Phoenix” by David Bednall, accompanied on violin by the famous Borislava Iltcheva.

Benda has been a solo recitalist and lecturer at universities, festivals, and cathedrals across the United States, including Yale University, Wesleyan University, Universities of Arizona, Iowa, and Northern Texas, East Texas Pipe Organ Festival, Glendale Methodist Church in Los Angeles, Christ Church Cathedral in New Orleans, St. Andrew’s Cathedral in Jackson, Mississippi, St. Mary’s Basilica in Minneapolis, Congregational Church from Plymouth to Seattle, etc.

Upcoming engagements include a solo concert at the 2022 Piccolo Spoleto Festival, a performance of organ concertos by Poulenc and Rheinberger with the Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra, the world premiere of James Callahan’s Organ Concerto No. of St. Thomas, and two solo concerts in Germany at Magdeburg Cathedral and at St. Peter and Paul in Niedernodeleben.

He is the chapel music director and organist at the University of Saint Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota, as well as an adjunct professor of organ in the music department. In 2015, he received his doctorate in musical arts from LSU under the mentorship of concert organist Herndon Spillman, a protege of Maurice Duruflé.

The program is free and open to the public.

St. Joseph’s Cathedral is also working to revitalize its secular ministries with a Ministry Stewardship Fair on Saturday and Sunday, March 19 and 20.

Fr. J. Cary Bani, rector/pastor of the cathedral, sees this effort as “a timely and timely way to invite and encourage our parishioners and friends, especially those who have begun to worship with us, to consider a greater involvement or renewed commitment to the parish. life and ministry.

Many lay ministries in the Cathedral Parish have dwindled in number over the past two years due to the effects of the coronavirus pandemic. Now, with most COVID-19 restrictions lifted, optional masking in church buildings, and increased attendance at weekend liturgies, the Cathedral Parish Development Group is leading the charge to strengthen its worship, community life, social responsibility and administrative ministries with new and returning volunteers.

Interested volunteers can apply for places in the areas of worship, social responsibility, community life and administrative support.

During the registration weekend, refreshments and drinks will be served in the parish hall after each of the masses at 4 p.m. on Saturday and at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. on Sunday.

The cathedral is located at 401 Main Street. For more information, contact the Cathedral Parish Office, (225) 387-5928 or office@cathedralbr.org.

Each week, we’ll highlight the best restaurants and events in metro Baton Rouge. Register today.

Community shower

Berean Seventh-day Adventist Church Young Adult Ministry believes that “it takes a whole village to raise a child,” so it hosts a community shower for children from birth to 8 years old.

The event runs from noon to 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 19, in the church parking lot, 4555 Fairfields Ave.

The list of donations includes diapers/wipes; girls’ clothing sizes from 0 to large for youth; boys’ clothing sizes from 0 to large for youth; new and lightly used children’s, boys’ and girls’ shoes; hygiene products (deodorant, lotions, soap, etc.); hair products (combs, brushes, knots, gels, etc.); and underwear and body shirts for boys and girls in sizes 2-10.

Donations are accepted until Friday, March 18 and can be dropped off at the church from 1-7 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday. Donors can also make a monetary donation through Cash App $Berean4555 and tag the donation “Community Shower”.

Pastor Wanted

Mount Pilgrim Missionary Baptist Church is seeking a leader to join its staff and congregation.

“This is a unique opportunity to lead a very healthy church into a new season of vibrant ministry and influence for Jesus,” a press release read.

Interested applicants may send an application letter and resume to Mount Pilgrim Missionary Baptist Church, 736 N. 35th St., Baton Rouge, LA 70802, hand-deliver to the church, or email beatrice_armstrong@subr. edu.

march march

Unity Baton Rouge invites the public to join a march at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 19, in front of the Baton Rouge African American Museum, 538 South Blvd.

The group will walk to the new Louisiana Civil Rights Trail.

For more information, call (225) 755-3043.

Deacon Events

Nathaniel Baptist Church, 5032 Highway 33 South, Centerville, Mississippi, invites all deacons for fellowship and training at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 19.

Guest speakers will be Dr. Henry Goings (“Deacons as Model Servants”) and Reverend Robert McCallum (“Deacons & Pastors’ Relationship”).

Dinner will be served.

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Aled Jones will perform at Liverpool Cathedral this month https://parishchurch.org.uk/aled-jones-will-perform-at-liverpool-cathedral-this-month/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/aled-jones-will-perform-at-liverpool-cathedral-this-month/ Popular classical singer Aled Jones MBE has announced a tour for February and March this year. His unique concert of music and stories will be played in cathedrals and churches across the UK. Starting at St Mary’s Church in Nottingham on February 23, the tour will take place at Liverpool Anglican Cathedral on March 14. […]]]>

Popular classical singer Aled Jones MBE has announced a tour for February and March this year.

His unique concert of music and stories will be played in cathedrals and churches across the UK.

Starting at St Mary’s Church in Nottingham on February 23, the tour will take place at Liverpool Anglican Cathedral on March 14.

READ MORE: Tesco Clubcard members can get a free ticket to English heritage sites this Mother’s Day

Round will see Aled perform tracks from his album Blessings, with a range of songs from different faiths including Quaker, Christian, Catholic, Islamic and Buddhist.

After beginning his career at the age of 12, Aled released 12 hit albums in four years, with the classic song “Walking In The Air” becoming a family favourite.

As well as having his own show on BBC Radio Wales, he hosts the most listened to Sunday show on Classic FM and has presented Songs Of Praise on BBC 1 for almost 20 years.

Aled will be joined on tour by nominated British classically trained soprano Carly Paoli, who performed in a duet with José Carreras for HRH The Prince of Wales at Windsor Castle.

Tour dates include:

  • 23 February – St Mary’s Church, Nottingham
  • 24 February – Bristol Cathedral, Bristol
  • 25 February – St David’s Cathedral, Pembrokeshire
  • February 27 – Winchester Cathedral, Winchester
  • 28 February – St Albans Cathedral, St Albans
  • March 1 – Guildford Cathedral, Guildford
  • 3 March – Wells Cathedral, Wells
  • March 4 – Wakefield Cathedral, Wakefield
  • 5 March – Chelmsford Cathedral, Chelmsford
  • March 7 – Manchester Monastery, Manchester
  • 8 March – Litchfield Cathedral, Litchfield
  • 10 March – Exeter Cathedral, Exeter
  • 11 March – Hereford Cathedral, Hereford
  • 12 March – Cardiff Llandaff Cathedral, Cardiff
  • 14 March – Liverpool Cathedral (Anglican), Liverpool
  • 15 March – Coventry Cathedral, Coventry
  • March 16 – Rochester Cathedral, Rochester
  • 18 March – Ely Cathedral, Ely
  • 19 March – Portsmouth Cathedral, Portsmouth
  • 21 March – Beverley Minster, Parish Centre, Beverley
  • 22 March – Durham Cathedral, Durham
  • 23 March – Paisley Abbey, Paisley
  • March 25 – Bangor Cathedral, Bangor
  • March 26 – St Asaph’s Cathedral, St Asaph

Tickets are available here from £28.

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Funds raised to repair former Roman Catholic Church in Barnstaple https://parishchurch.org.uk/funds-raised-to-repair-former-roman-catholic-church-in-barnstaple/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 12:52:41 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/funds-raised-to-repair-former-roman-catholic-church-in-barnstaple/ Historic England has awarded a grant of £196,832 to help repair the old Roman Catholic Church – also known as Old St Mary’s – in Barnstaple. The Diocese of Plymouth is also meeting the cost of the first phase of repairs to the Grade II listed building. Work has recently been launched to: • stabilize […]]]>

Historic England has awarded a grant of £196,832 to help repair the old Roman Catholic Church – also known as Old St Mary’s – in Barnstaple.

The Diocese of Plymouth is also meeting the cost of the first phase of repairs to the Grade II listed building.

Work has recently been launched to:

• stabilize the arch and buttresses of the choir by inserting pins and steel clips

• restore and repoint the exterior masonry

• repair the roof structure and cover certain areas with slate

• repair windows



Scaffolding of Barnstaple 2 RC Church (c) Neil Butterfield

The work should be completed this summer. The building will then dry out while plans for its reuse are fully developed, in collaboration with the community.

The church opened in 1855 to serve the growing community in the Trinity area of ​​Barnstaple.

Following its closure as a place of worship in 1984, there were proposals for its demolition.

There is now a concerted effort to repair the building and return it to service.

Selaine Saxby, MP for North Devon, said: ‘I know the community of Trinity Street in Barnstaple has worked hard for many years to persuade the Diocese of Plymouth to repair and restore this church so that it can be used by the community.

“It is wonderful news that the Diocese has launched this project and that Historic England has stepped in to help fund the much needed structural work.

“I can’t wait to see the plans for how we can bring this incredible building back to life.”



Former Church of the Immaculate Conception Barnstaple

Rebecca Barrett, Regional Director of Historic England, said: ‘It’s great to see the repairs to this remarkable building underway. We hope that our support, and that of the diocese, will ensure this for generations to come.

Sir Neil Butterfield, Diocesan Administrator and Chairman of the Project Committee, said: “The Diocese of Plymouth is very grateful to Historic England for their generous contribution to the costs of restoring and refurbishing this important Catholic monument in Barnstaple.

“For too long the old church has been neglected and abandoned: it is an exciting prospect that the building can finally be restored and brought back into use.”

The church was one of the first post-Reformation Catholic churches to be built in Devon. It was designed to serve the community in the Trinity area of ​​Barnstaple which was growing rapidly in the early 19th century.

The site was purchased in 1842 and the church opened for worship in 1855.

It is one of the first and probably the most successful neo-Romanesque design of the county.



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When the church opened in 1855, the North Devon Journal reported that it had been designed by AWN Pugin (1812-1852), the famous pioneer of English Gothic Revival architecture and designer of the interior of the Palace of Westminster and the Elizabeth Tower, home to Big Ben.

However, it is more likely that the architect was Gideon Boyce of Tiverton and the building was completed by RD Gould of Barnstaple.

The Church of the Immaculate Conception functioned as a Roman Catholic place of worship for residents of Barnstaple and surrounding areas until 1984 when a larger church, known as St Mary’s, was built alongside .

St Mary’s remains an active church with weekday and Sunday masses as well as regular weddings, baptisms and funerals.

The Catholic Parish of the Immaculate Conception covers a large geographical area including the towns of Barnstaple and South Molton, many local villages and parts of Exmoor.

There are two churches in the parish – the parish church of St Mary, Immaculate Mother of God, in Barnstaple and the church of St Joseph in South Molton. The parish priest is Canon Peter Morgan.



Left to right: Canon Peter Morgan, Sir Neil Butterfield, Selaine Saxby, Rebecca Barrett

Historic England invites you to share your knowledge and images of listed places, so we can record important facts, and even unlock some secrets.

We’ve changed the design of our listing pages so you can see at a glance the listing details, full listing description, and fantastic listing-enriching contributions that have been added so far. now.

Rebecca said: “Contributors can now add film clips if they have a YouTube account.

“We would like people to add photos, information, memories and film clips (YouTube account required) that will be posted on the list entry information for all to see.

“Find out how to enrich the list here: https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/enrich-the-list/.”

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St Mary’s Roman Catholic Church and the Missing Link of Barrow Skyline https://parishchurch.org.uk/st-marys-roman-catholic-church-and-the-missing-link-of-barrow-skyline/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/st-marys-roman-catholic-church-and-the-missing-link-of-barrow-skyline/ Metal scaffolding tubes glistened in the sun as a missing link in Barrow’s skyline was restored to its rightful place atop St Mary’s Church, The Mail reported in September 1988. The city’s oldest Catholic church on Duke Street would be submerged in scaffolding until Christmas, when it was hoped the £100,000 restoration program would be […]]]>

Metal scaffolding tubes glistened in the sun as a missing link in Barrow’s skyline was restored to its rightful place atop St Mary’s Church, The Mail reported in September 1988.

The city’s oldest Catholic church on Duke Street would be submerged in scaffolding until Christmas, when it was hoped the £100,000 restoration program would be complete.

Works included a new fiberglass cross, electronic bell, fully decorated interior and a traditionally restored organ.

St Mary’s had suffered damage in a hurricane in February 1988 when the masonry of the steeple was scattered on nearby streets and crashed through the roof, ruining a new organ.

Architect Jonathon Pritchard said: “The wind lifted the whole roof and moved it across the church. It was amazing to see. It was actually swaying as we stood in the church.

Church authorities took the relatively unusual step of installing a fiberglass cross to replace the old cast-iron one, which would have turned 100 in October of that year.

“We need to look to the future and use modern materials,” Prichard said. “A fiberglass cross will resist the wind better and be easier to maintain than a cast iron cross.

“It’s an important part of the Barrow skyline – so we’re making sure we get it right.”

Structural damage had meant that the bells had remained silent for many years, but it was hoped that the installation of electric hammers would ensure a trouble-free future, although there would be old-fashioned ropes in case modern technology would break down.

In 1989, St Mary’s Church proudly wore the new fiberglass cross, made by Walney yacht builder Alan Newton and breaking new ground in his field.

“It’s something new and unique,” ​​Mr. Newton said.

It replaced the cast iron cross destroyed during the gales of the previous year. It weighed over 500 pounds while the new cross weighed only 56 pounds.

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Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington to lift masking requirement for its Catholic schools in Maryland starting Feb. 21 – Catholic Standard https://parishchurch.org.uk/roman-catholic-archdiocese-of-washington-to-lift-masking-requirement-for-its-catholic-schools-in-maryland-starting-feb-21-catholic-standard/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 20:42:36 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/roman-catholic-archdiocese-of-washington-to-lift-masking-requirement-for-its-catholic-schools-in-maryland-starting-feb-21-catholic-standard/ On February 21, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington will lift the masking requirement for students, staff and visitors to Catholic schools located in the five Maryland counties that are part of the archdiocese. However, the masking requirement for Catholic schools in the District of Columbia remains in place, per a directive earlier this week […]]]>

On February 21, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington will lift the masking requirement for students, staff and visitors to Catholic schools located in the five Maryland counties that are part of the archdiocese. However, the masking requirement for Catholic schools in the District of Columbia remains in place, per a directive earlier this week by the DC government.

The relaxation of the masking mandate in Catholic schools in Maryland was announced by Kelly Branaman, archdiocesan secretary for Catholic schools and superintendent of schools, in a Feb. 17 letter to parents and guardians.

“We met with school leaders to organize and prepare their communities. Based on the readiness needs of each school’s leadership, schools will transition between February 21 and February 28,” Branaman wrote to parents. “We appreciate and will fully support any decisions parents make for their own children about whether or not to wear a face covering at school. Enforcement of this decision is between the parent and the child, not the school staff.

Branaman said face coverings will be “voluntary and optional in jurisdictions where possible.”

Making compliance with the new masking policy voluntary “will allow our parents and staff to decide what they think is right based on their own circumstances,” she said in the letter. “This approach balances the desires of parents, students and staff who wish to continue wearing masks with those who do not, while keeping our schools safe.”

Branaman noted that while students and parents can decide whether or not to wear a mask at school, “CDC and local regulations still require anyone using public transportation, including students using school buses public, continue to wear a face covering.”

In Maryland on February 14, Gov. Larry Hogan announced that masking mandates will be lifted in state buildings beginning February 22. This relaxation of masking requirements does not include public schools. The state Board of Education is scheduled to meet Feb. 22 to consider its masking mandate.

In the District of Columbia, students, staff and visitors to Catholic schools across the city will continue to be required to wear masks.

On Feb. 14, DC Mayor Muriel Bowser said the district would relax masking requirements starting March 1. On that date, masks will no longer be required in churches, grocery stores, restaurants and bars, and sports and entertainment venues. Masks, however, will still be needed in schools, libraries, healthcare facilities and on public transport.

“Catholic schools located in the District of Columbia remain subject to the district’s masking order,” Branaman wrote to parents and guardians. “As we receive additional updates regarding any status changes in the district, we will continue to share this information with our school communities.”

She added that the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington is “advocating with city officials to make face coverings optional for our school district families.”

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington has more than 25,500 students enrolled in 90 Catholic schools, from kindergarten through high school, located in the District of Columbia and five counties in Maryland: Montgomery, Prince George’s, Charles, Calvert and St. Mary’s.

Since March 2020 – when the pandemic was first declared – Catholic schools have implemented safety protocols and teaching strategies to ensure the well-being of students and staff. These protocols included health screenings, following masking mandates from the various jurisdictions that make up the Archdiocese, limiting visitors to schools, and adopting different teaching methods such as blended and distance learning. After school campuses closed as a precaution in the spring of 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many Catholic schools in the Archdiocese reopened for in-person learning this fall, while other schools offered virtual classes. or hybrids. In the current 2021-22 school year, all Catholic schools in the Archdiocese have reopened for in-person learning.

“While masking has been one of the health and safety protocols that has kept our schools open, experts have begun to recognize that masking children has its downsides,” Branaman wrote in his letter of the February 17. “We recognize that many parents and students have asked for measures such as mask requirements to be relaxed more quickly. Others say they would feel more comfortable maintaining precautions a bit longer.

Branaman said the Archdiocese’s decision to change its masking requirements was based on several factors:

• A growing consensus of local experts and across the country has determined that it is now safe to eliminate mask mandates for schools.

• Localities with indoor mask mandates have begun announcing plans to lift those requirements in most indoor settings.

• Significant numbers of people have been vaccinated, including younger children, and Catholic schools in Maryland and the District of Columbia are in one of the most vaccinated areas in the country.

• The number of cases has also steadily declined locally over the past month as a result of the delta and omicron variants.

“The health and safety of the young people in our care, as well as that of our staff, is of the highest priority in the schools of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington,” Branaman said. “This has been no less true amid the COVID pandemic, during which (the Archdiocese) has sought to carefully balance the interests of student health and effective learning.”

The decision by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington follows similar announcements from neighboring dioceses. The Archdiocese of Baltimore ended its masking mandate for Catholic schools on February 13. The Diocese of Arlington, Virginia, following Governor Glenn Youngkin’s executive order, lifted its masking mandate in late January.

As of February 16, 2022, more than 78.1 million US residents have tested positive for the coronavirus since the pandemic was first declared in March 2020, resulting in 927,000 deaths. In Maryland, a total of 994,577 cases of COVID-19 have resulted in 13,705 deaths. In the District of Columbia, a total of 133,495 cases of COVID-19 have resulted in 1,311 deaths.

Nationally, new coronavirus cases have fallen by more than 80% since a spike in the Omicron variant of the virus in January.

Over the past two weeks, the average daily number of COVID-19 cases in Maryland has fallen by 65% ​​and the number of hospitalizations due to the virus has fallen by 49%. In the district, average daily cases of COVID-19 have dropped by 46% and hospitalizations due to the virus have dropped by 41%.

Branaman said Catholic schools in the Archdiocese “will continue to monitor local conditions and implement careful protective measures and mitigation strategies as we strive to provide safe, in-person education.”

“If a major spike in cases or a severe variant emerges, government authorities may reinstate a face covering requirement. As we have done previously, we will consult with medical experts and public health officials for guidance,” Branaman wrote. “All Archdiocesan schools will continue to adhere to applicable public health guidelines for those who test positive for COVID-19 and those who have been exposed. »

(See the full text of Branaman’s letter here.)

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Special guests announced for upcoming visit to Aled Jones Cathedral https://parishchurch.org.uk/special-guests-announced-for-upcoming-visit-to-aled-jones-cathedral/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 14:03:45 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/special-guests-announced-for-upcoming-visit-to-aled-jones-cathedral/ SPECIAL guests have been revealed for the upcoming visit to Aled Jones Cathedral. The tenor has announced that he will be joined by classically trained pianist and composer Tamara Konstantin and British nominated soprano Carly Paoli. Having performed for HRH Prince Charles, Tamara has been honored by her home country and has had her highly […]]]>

SPECIAL guests have been revealed for the upcoming visit to Aled Jones Cathedral.

The tenor has announced that he will be joined by classically trained pianist and composer Tamara Konstantin and British nominated soprano Carly Paoli.

Having performed for HRH Prince Charles, Tamara has been honored by her home country and has had her highly acclaimed compositions performed on Classic FM and BBC Radio.

But music is actually her third successful career – she was the first female political presenter on Georgian television, before becoming vice-president of an oil company.

Ten years ago she returned to her early love of music and three hit albums followed.

His most recent work, Resilience (published by Lastman Music), combines his own fascinating and passionate compositions with his love of the romanticism of Chopin, the strength of Rachmaninoff and the dynamism of Beethoven. Created during the pandemic, it testifies to Tamara’s belief in the power of music to comfort, uplift and bring people together.

Tamara will perform with her trio, the Three Graces, which includes world-renowned cellist Jiaxin Lloyd Webber and violinist Elly Suh.

Born in the UK but with strong Italian roots, Carly Paoli did a duet with José Carreras for HRH the Prince of Wales at Windsor Castle and with Andrea Bocelli, which later aired on PBS television.

Her new album, Carly Paoli & Friends released in September 2021 is an eclectic selection of duets covering all musical genres.

Featuring artists such as Joseph Calleja, Elaine Paige and Tony Hadley in one of the most remarkable witty numbers, she is joined by Aled himself in a new version of the beautiful Irish anthem, Be Thou My Vision.

Starting at St Mary’s Church in Nottingham on February 23, the cathedral tour will visit some of the UK’s finest sacred buildings, including Bristol Cathedral, Manchester Monastery, Coventry Cathedral and Durham Cathedral , before ending at St Asaph’s Cathedral on March 26. .

The Walking In The Air star and Songs Of Praise presenter will return to Bangor Cathedral on March 25.

The tour will see Aled perform tracks from his album Blessings, which features songs from different faiths – Quaker, Christian, Catholic, Muslim and Buddhist – including uplifting hymns, lyrics and scriptures set to music.

Forty years have passed since Aled was an altar boy at Bangor Cathedral, having received countless prestigious awards, record sales and chart success.

He is the original star of the classic crossover, having performed for the Pope and the Royal Family, received an MBE and amassed over 10 million album sales throughout his extraordinary career.

After beginning his career at the age of 12, Aled became one of the most successful boy sopranos in the world, releasing 12 hit albums in 4 years, the defining moment being Walking In The Air, the hit song from the family favorite movie The Snowman. .

He has since released over 40 albums and has over 40 silver, gold and platinum records.

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Little Rock Cathedral Hosts Catholic Music Conference – Arkansas Catholic https://parishchurch.org.uk/little-rock-cathedral-hosts-catholic-music-conference-arkansas-catholic/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 05:01:17 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/little-rock-cathedral-hosts-catholic-music-conference-arkansas-catholic/ U.S. and Canadian Cathedral music directors meet for first time in Arkansas Posted: January 13, 2022 By Chris PriceArkansas Catholic Staff Chris Price Beau Baldwin, organist and director of music at St. Andrew’s Cathedral, conducts St. Andrew’s Choir while Colin MacKnight, director of music at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Little Rock, plays the organ during […]]]>

U.S. and Canadian Cathedral music directors meet for first time in Arkansas

Posted: January 13, 2022

Chris Price

Beau Baldwin, organist and director of music at St. Andrew’s Cathedral, conducts St. Andrew’s Choir while Colin MacKnight, director of music at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Little Rock, plays the organ during Vespers for open the 39th annual conference of the Roman Catholic Cathedral Musicians in Little Rock on January 3.

More than 35 professional musicians who serve cathedrals in the United States and Canada gathered in Arkansas for the first time to exchange ideas and grow in their ministry.

The 39th Annual Conference of Roman Catholic Cathedral Musicians was held January 3-6 at St. Andrew’s Cathedral in Little Rock. The four-day event allowed cathedral musicians to dialogue, reflect and participate in the professional development of the Church’s liturgical ministry.

Beau Baldwin, organist and director of music at St. Andrew’s Cathedral and host of this year’s event, said he was delighted to organize the conference as it was the first time it had been held in Arkansas and the first in the South for many years.

The lecture marked the 30th anniversary of the installation of the cathedral’s 66-row Nichols and Simpson organ, which dates from 1932.

“There is great joy in this because we can celebrate the beauty of Church music and its ability to draw others to Christ,” Fr. de Orbegozo said. “If you have a good music director, he evangelizes, promotes the beauty of faith, and helps train members of the Church.”

“It was great to get people to come here and see the city, the cathedral and our music program,” Baldwin said. “We made an offer to have him in Little Rock before the pandemic hit. The conference moves every year, and we usually go to remote locations. He hasn’t been in the South since the mid-90s, when it was in Atlanta.

Father Joseph de Orbegozo, administrator of the cathedral, said the conference is important because it benefits music ministers and the Church as a whole.

“There is great joy in this because we can celebrate the beauty of Church music and its ability to draw others to Christ,” Fr. de Orbegozo said. “If you have a good music director, he evangelizes, promotes the beauty of faith, and helps train members of the Church.”

The conference originated after Peter LaManna, Gerald Muller, and Richard Proulx collaborated on the search for a new musical director for the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C., in 1983. The first event involved 17 musicians of the cathedral who met at the cathedral-basilica. from St. Peter and St. Paul to Philadelphia in November 1984.

This year’s conference was highlighted with an opening Vespers service featuring the St. Andrew’s Cathedral Choir and dinner; business meetings and discussions; a keynote address by Father Anthony Ruff, OSB, monk at St. John’s Abbey in Collegeville, Minnesota; an organ recital by Colin MacKnight, director of music at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Little Rock, and organ tours and performances at Subiaco Abbey and St. Mary’s Church in Altus.

David Summers, director of music and organist at St. Joseph’s Cathedral in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, said he attended the CRCCM to network with other cathedral musicians and gather ideas to take home. .

“I really like to find out what other cathedrals are doing; maybe confirm my decisions to schedule certain types of music; discuss emerging trends, such as the reintroduction of Renaissance music and song; and hear about new compositions and how other directors conduct their choirs,” Summers said. “Being able to call someone I met at conference and say, ‘Hey, do you have an idea for this’ or ‘Our bishop is asking us to have this kind of Mass’ and be able to ask for help, it’s really cool .”

Ernest R. Neal, music director and choir director at Holy Family Cathedral in Tulsa, Okla., said it was his first CRCCM to attend.

“I’ve been a member of the organization for many years, but conferences have always been a long way off,” Neal said. “This year it was so close – driving distance – so I decided to come.”

Along with meeting other music directors and getting ideas, he said he enjoyed being able to listen to how others did things and worship without the responsibility of providing music.

“It kind of helps you break out of your own box,” he said. “If you hear something different, it inspires you to try different things – different styles, music and so on.”


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New principals at Blessed Sacrament and Cathedral optimistic about future of Catholic education in Lincoln | Education https://parishchurch.org.uk/new-principals-at-blessed-sacrament-and-cathedral-optimistic-about-future-of-catholic-education-in-lincoln-education/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 11:45:00 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/new-principals-at-blessed-sacrament-and-cathedral-optimistic-about-future-of-catholic-education-in-lincoln-education/ So I went to Pius X High School, and taught a variety of things. And while I was there, I graduated in Educational Administration. I didn’t expect to switch to administration so soon. And, honestly, I never wanted to get into administration until I just had the opportunity to lead and I really enjoyed supporting […]]]>


So I went to Pius X High School, and taught a variety of things. And while I was there, I graduated in Educational Administration. I didn’t expect to switch to administration so soon. And, honestly, I never wanted to get into administration until I just had the opportunity to lead and I really enjoyed supporting the teachers. So I really loved it.

Miller: I am a product of the CCD (Confraternité de la doctrine chretienne, a program that provides Catholic education to students in public schools). I went to college in Sioux City, Iowa, Briar Cliff and played softball for a few years. I went back to UNL just to be closer to my family and got my bachelor’s degree in primary education. I taught for a year at St. Mary’s here in Lincoln. It just didn’t suit me, so I joined the public sector. And then I taught in college, I loved college. At one point, I was piloting a new writing program.

And someone said to me, “Have you thought about becoming, for example, an educational coach? And I said, “No, what is it?” So I obtained my first master’s degree in reading with the mention ELL (English language learner). So I got that, taught for another year, and then a teaching coach position opened up at Lakeview Elementary School. I got really involved in opening a family literacy program in Lakeview for non-English speaking families.


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Washington’s Roman Catholic Archdiocese outlines precautions for safe Christmas masses – Catholic Standard https://parishchurch.org.uk/washingtons-roman-catholic-archdiocese-outlines-precautions-for-safe-christmas-masses-catholic-standard/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 15:23:51 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/washingtons-roman-catholic-archdiocese-outlines-precautions-for-safe-christmas-masses-catholic-standard/ As Catholics prepare for Christmas celebrations, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington continues to prioritize policies to ensure that in-person attendance at Mass safely reduces the risk of the coronavirus spreading. At the same time, the Archdiocese, many parishes and the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception continue to offer the possibility […]]]>


As Catholics prepare for Christmas celebrations, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington continues to prioritize policies to ensure that in-person attendance at Mass safely reduces the risk of the coronavirus spreading. At the same time, the Archdiocese, many parishes and the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception continue to offer the possibility of participating in Mass through YouTube and other platforms.

Masses on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day are usually among the most frequented liturgies in Catholic churches. With more people vaccinated against COVID-19, mass attendance at Christmas is expected to increase from last year, as vaccines were just starting to become available.

Parishes in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington still follow the guidelines (https://adw.org/coronavirus/) which have been updated regularly throughout the pandemic. They include:

• In accordance with local regulations, masks are mandatory inside churches in Prince George and Montgomery counties. Starting Tuesday, December 21, the District of Columbia will reinstate its mask mandate. Calvert, Charles and St. Mary’s counties currently do not require the use of masks. However, in October, Father Daniel B. Carson, Vicar General and Curia Moderator for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington, informed priests that even in jurisdictions that do not require the mask, “pastors have the right to do so. discretion to ask the faithful to continue to mask themselves. in their respective parishes if they wish. Therefore, pastors in jurisdictions that do not require masks still have the prerogative to require that spectators of Mass in their parish wear a mask.

All jurisdictions can change their policies if conditions warrant.

• Ordinary and extraordinary Communion ministers are required to wear masks when distributing Communion.

• Social distancing is always encouraged indoors. Pastors are allowed to reduce the distance to allow use of all rows. Pastors may also choose to reserve a section of the church that maintains a 6-foot distance for those who wish to maintain more social distancing.

People who are reluctant to celebrate Christmas in a full church are encouraged to join one of the many masses available online. Here are some options for locating one:

• The Archdiocese’s YouTube page (www.youtube.com/c/WashArchdiocese/featured) and link to Mass on Christmas Eve (https://adw.org/event/vigil-mass-for-the-solemnity-of-the-nativity-of-the-lord/)

• Directory of parishes (https://adw.org/parishes-masses/parish-mass-finder/) many of which list their own options for online masses on their websites.

• Masses of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception (www.nationalshrine.org/mass/).

As is always the case when Christmas falls on a Saturday, parishes will offer Sunday Masses as usual on December 26. Check with each parish to see if the hours have been adjusted.


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St. Mary’s Cathedral in Perth sets up COVID vaccination clinic as WA prepares for February reopening https://parishchurch.org.uk/st-marys-cathedral-in-perth-sets-up-covid-vaccination-clinic-as-wa-prepares-for-february-reopening/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 08:35:14 +0000 https://parishchurch.org.uk/st-marys-cathedral-in-perth-sets-up-covid-vaccination-clinic-as-wa-prepares-for-february-reopening/ Malls, hardware stores and mosques have hosted COVID-19 vaccination clinics – and now a cathedral in the heart of Perth’s CBD is helping support Western Australia’s deployment. Key points: Sainte-Marie Cathedral has opened a pop-up COVID-19 vaccination clinic Church members say clinic is for the “common good” Public health experts say more targeted messaging is […]]]>


Malls, hardware stores and mosques have hosted COVID-19 vaccination clinics – and now a cathedral in the heart of Perth’s CBD is helping support Western Australia’s deployment.

St. Mary’s Cathedral, near the Royal Perth Hospital, is the latest pop-up clinic to open in hopes of attracting both parishioners and members of the public.

Curtin University professor of global public health Jaya Dantas said she expected the state government to continue using pop-up clinics throughout the deployment.

“When vaccines are distributed to people, it is easier for them to get vaccinated, so removing some of the logistical and transport barriers would also help,” she said.

Public health expert Jaya Dantas says she expects the rollout of COVID-19 vaccination clinics to continue.(ABC News: Keane Bourke)

“These pop-up clinics would be in community centers, in places like libraries, in places like religious places.

“It means people gather in these places and there are more opportunities for people to just come in and get the shot.”

About two dozen people were at the cathedral clinic when it opened today, with more expected in the afternoon.

The Dean of the Cathedral, the Very Reverend Dr Sean Fernandez, received his booster dose of the vaccine.

He said it was important for the church to play its part in rolling out the vaccine.

“This is an important place in our church in Perth, and we want to reach out to Catholics in the community and the community at large, and show that we support this,” he said.

“We’re used to being behind health efforts and supporting the community, and that’s only part of that process.”

Opening of a clinic “for the common good”

Some Catholics have opposed vaccination because of concerns about the history of vaccine research.

“In some parts of the Catholic community there is concern because at the very beginning of the development of medical interventions … which ultimately led to these vaccines, there was some involvement of cell lines derived from aborted children,” said the Archbishop of Perth, Timothy Costelloe, said.

“And of course, the Catholic Church, our position on abortion is very, very clear, so there was a bit of confusion about it.”

A close-up of Timothy Costelloe inside St Mary's Cathedral.
Archbishop Timothy Costelloe has said the Church’s official position supports vaccination against COVID-19.(ABC News: Keane Bourke)

But Archbishop Costelloe said the Church’s position on immunization was clear.

“In our Catholic approach to things, we don’t just talk about what I want or what is best for me or my rights,” he said.

“We have a fundamental principle that we make decisions on the basis of what is right for the common good.

During the week, a priest at a church in the southern suburbs of Perth wrote in his Christmas post – published in a local newspaper – that people were being forced to get the COVID-19 vaccine for fear of losing their jobs or not to be allowed to do so. to travel.

Archbishop Costelloe acknowledged that some within the Church would have different views, but the official position was clear.

“The important thing for us, having this here, is to indicate what the formal position of the Archdiocese is,” he said.

“Some people may have difficulty with this position, but it is the formal position of the Church.”

“It’s just the convenience”

Susana and Rohan Gay visited the clinic to receive their booster dose.

A portrait of Rohan and Susana Gay.
Rohan and Susana Gay received booster doses at St Mary’s Cathedral clinic.(ABC News: Keane Bourke)

Both supported the idea of ​​using pop-up clinics to bring the vaccine closer to people.

“[At GP clinics], we have to make an appointment and all that, where this one we can just show up, ”Ms. Gay said.

“It’s just the convenience, it’s close to where we live.”

Keith Claessen was also going to seek his recall.

“We come here for the Christmas service mainly,” he said.

“For me it’s been exactly five months, we thought we would get it ASAP.”

A targeted message is important: expert

Professor Dantas has been following the vaccine rollout closely and said smaller clinics would be important – not only for the main rollout, but also for the booster doses.

She said part of the advantage was that they were often in places familiar to people, like drugstores.

“Same thing with the community center, or in another pop-up clinic where there will be people who will give the health messages at the same time as the booster injections. “

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Western Australia is set to let in COVID-19. How will the reopening of the state work?

But concerns remain over vaccination rates in some communities, with double-dose rates for Indigenous Australians over the age of 15 in some regional areas as low as 42%.

These communities also need to receive more attention, according to Professor Dantas.

“We have engaged with our community health workers, but we need to do it in a much more effective way… where there is very little buy-in,” she said.

“So have targeted messages, for example, in indigenous communities or in migrant communities, where the rates are below 50%.

“We need to increase those immunization rates, and that’s where we need to do targeted interventions or messages to increase those immunization rates.”

Pop-up clinics represent a sixth of recent doses

WA has used pop-up clinics in shopping malls, schools, libraries, and even Perth stadium events to try to increase the state’s vaccination rate.

In the past 11 days, 3,619 vaccines have been administered at these clinics, according to WA Health.

That’s less than a sixth of the 27,187 doses that were administered on Friday alone.

But a spokesperson for WA Health said that didn’t tell the whole story.

“Many pop-up clinics target community groups with the lowest vaccination rates,” she said.

“The clinics were successful because they allowed people to receive their first, second and booster doses.

“These are people who protect themselves, their loved ones and the community from the risk of serious illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19.”

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What experts know so far about the Omicron variant(Norman swan)

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